open - Page number 3

Open sound series: Part 3 - Ampache

Building a community is core to all open source projects. In fact, an open source project that lacks a community is likely missing the point of being open source. So what happens when your open project is designed to create communities? » Read more

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Seriously, why do you still have an iPhone?

All right, I get it. The iPhone is certainly a leader in both terms of sales and product ingenuity. I have often been known to blast Apple for being late to a party, then claiming they are introducing some incredible new feature (see Spaces vs Virtual Desktops). I won't hide the fact that I am not a fan of Apple. Even so, the iPhone is truly something innovative. » Read more

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Five questions about authenticity and the open source way with Jim Gilmore

A few months ago, I had the opportunity to meet Jim Gilmore, co-author (with Joseph Pine) of the book Authenticity: What Consumers Really Want. I first read the book a few years ago, and it really struck a nerve for me—these guys were on to something.

So I convinced Jim to subject himself to a Five Questions interview about the place where authenticity and the open source way intersect. » Read more

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Musings of an open source peddler

Open source is an interesting thing to say the least. In fact, that's quite an understatement. Allow me to explain: » Read more

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BusinessWeek turns an eye to open source beyond technology

Here at opensource.com, we aspire to take principles the open source software movement has applied to building better software faster and find more uses for them in business, education, government, the law, and generally in our lives. » Read more

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Community-building tip: surprise is the opposite of engagement

In the interview with Chris Blizzard I posted last week, near the end of the article Chris attributes a phrase to Mozilla CEO John Lilly:

"Surprise is the opposite of engagement."

This may be one of the most simple, brilliant things I have ever heard someone say when it comes to creating engaged, active communities. » Read more

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How much transparency is too much?

Years ago when I interned at Red Hat, the company had an intranet traffic competition. Employees were encouraged to create or improve their page on the intranet, then post a link that told why you should visit. The person with the most traffic at the end of the week would win a prize.

I don't remember who won—maybe the guy whose link advertised “naked chicks”? But I do remember one entry: a certain software engineer posted his current salary “in the interest of transparency.” It was a surefire way to draw traffic—and spark conversation. » Read more

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Jaron Lanier: open textbooks "appalling and preposterous"

Jaron Lanier is certainly getting his share of press lately.  His latest guest starring role: a rant in Monday's very special episode of L. Gordon Crozier's technology column for the Wall Street Journal.  Seems like Lanier is becoming a go-to guy when one is in need of a sound bite denouncing "free culture" in all of its radical and dangerous forms.
» Read more

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Free Texts: Sources

There are a few interesting things to talk about surrounding free and open textbooks. Quality is one. Usability is another. Why to write one (and/or, why not) is certainly critical. But where can you find these disruptive, open texts? » Read more

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Video: Robots that make things! (And how sharing is the best way to run a business and your life.)

A few folks from Red Hat's video team had the opportunity last summer to attend the first Open Video Conference in New York. We met some inspiring, open minded, and highly motived people and even got the chance to talk to a few of them on camera. (You know, just doing our job.)

One person that we absolutely had to talk to was Bre Pettis: video blogger, open source advocate, entrepreneur, and all around great guy. Bre is one of the founders of MakerBot Industries, a company that makes "robots that make things." Awesome robots. Awesome things. » Read more

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