opengov - Page number 5

An open source city takes shape: Open, online tools and data

An open source city takes shape: Open, online tools and data

Open government scored another victory when the City of Raleigh announced the Open Raleigh initiative—an online repository with open data, web and mobile applications, and links to participatory tools and organizations. It’s all part of Raleigh’s open source strategy focusing on transparency, collaboration, and improved access to information. It’s proof of the ongoing work of the public-facing, open source resolution Raleigh unanimously passed earlier this year. » Read more

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European Parliament expects open source usage report

European Parliament expects open source usage report

The European Parliament's Directorate General for Innovation and Technological Support is to produce report on the EP's free and open source software programmes. MEP Bart Staes (Group of the Green and European Free Alliance) on 10 May added this as a requirement for the discharge of the EP's 2010 budget committee. » Read more

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The merits of failing faster

Fail faster

Promoting a culture that supports failure is a foreign concept to most people, but not for the panelists speaking about open government and business at CityCamp Raleigh. According to the panelists, who range from vice presidents of corporations to chief information officers of Raleigh government, there is a general consensus that failing faster provides a quicker path to innovation. » Read more

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GovHack, GovCamp, GovJam aim to advance Gov 2.0 in Australia

GovHack, GovCamp, GovJam aim to advance Gov 2.0 in Australia

Not one, but three upcoming events will bring more open government to Australia over the course of a week. GovHack, GovCamp, and GovJam will collectively allow citizens to interact with the public sector to collaborate, innovate, and share--advancing Gov 2.0 by using government data in new ways. » Read more

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CityCamp Raleigh sets up for year two this weekend, $5000 prize

CityCamp Raleigh

Last year, CityCamp Raleigh raised the bar on the city’s adoption of open sourced solutions and helped bring citizens to the problem solving table. This weekend, the gang behind the event are hosting it again with the same $5000 prize for the best idea and solution. » Read more

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Innovation and collaboration stifled in red tape

Innovation and collaboration stifled in red tape

It is hard to think of any environment as conducive to innovation as the Internet. With a good idea and the motivation to follow it through, anything is possible. Look at Wikipedia, the Google search engine, and Facebook, to name just a few success stories.

Behind them are thousands of less famous web-based innovations that are also having a huge impact on society. These include many thousands of small firms and individual web developers based in Europe.

Collaboration is vital. Technologies do not emerge out of the blue. They are built on innovations by others – building-block technologies that are offered up as industry standards. » Read more

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Does hosting an innovation summit mean you're innovative?

Does hosting an innovation summit mean you're innovative?

Last January, the City of Raleigh partnered with the Raleigh Chamber of Commerce, North Carolina State University, and local businesses to host the inaugural Innovation Summit. The purpose of the summit was to bring business leaders, entrepreneurs, marketers, investors, city officials, and thought leaders together for an afternoon of discovery. Open source was at the heart of how the organizers were looking to achieve consensus from those invited to participate.

There were four main topics organizers focused on to kick off this initiative: funding, partnerships, branding, and space for an innovation center. The summit started with two keynote speakers that helped set the stage for the day. » Read more

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Mainstreaming the Gov 2.0 message in the Canadian Public Service

Mainstreaming the Gov 2.0 message in the Canadian Public Service

A couple of years ago I wrote a Globe Op-Ed "A Click Heard Across the Public Service" that outlined the significance of the clerk using GCPEDIA to communicate with public servants. It was a message - or even more importantly - an action to affirm his commitment to change how government works. For those unfamiliar, the Clerk of the Privy Council is the head of the public service for the federal government, a crude analogy would be he is the CEO and the Prime Minister is the Chairman (yes, I know that analogy is going to get me in trouble with people...) » Read more

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Can government agencies be innovative?

Can government agencies be innovative?

Six reasons why government is not more innovative

Steve Denning recently wrote a great post titled How To Make Government Innovative Again. In his post Denning asks the following:

Why isn’t the Government generally more agile? Why isn’t innovation part of everything government does? Denning’s answer to these questions are: "Simple. The constraints on talented people who work in government agencies are enormous." Denning lists six reasons why government is not more innovative. » Read more

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The next generation of open source software procurement models

The next generation of open source software procurement models

Swedish Framework Agreement Overcomes FUD, Inertia, Risks and Other Barriers

One year ago, the new Swedish framework agreement for the procurement of open source became active. Five suppliers were contracted to provide software and services. Central government, the public educational sector, all twenty county councils, and 225 out of the 290 Swedish municipalities are participating. They call off mini competitions for contracts the suppliers then have to battle for. This model differs from the recommendations made in the European 'Guideline on public procurement of Open Source Software', aiming to overcome current barriers and increase the use of open source.

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