openness - Page number 5

Tell your story with opensource.com at the Summit

Earlier this year, Red Hat launched opensource.com as a way to shine a light on the places where the open source way is multiplying ideas and effort beyond technology. The open source way is more than a development model; it defines the characteristics of a culture. Openness. Transparency. Collaboration. Diversity. Rapid prototyping.

Through opensource.com, we want to find out where the open source way is headed next. Hear what you're doing. Tell you how to get involved. Help you apply it to your life and the world around you. » Read more

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How transparent is the White House?

Dave Cole, Senior Advisor to the CIO of the Executive Office of the President, presented an awesome keynote to more than 3,000 attendees at DrupalCon San Francisco 2010 on April 21. His keynote was about open source in government, and he talked about how whitehouse.gov has become a platform to foster citizen participation. Although I found the technology part interesting, it was the philosophy and open source principles that Dave talked about that are enabling the executive branch of the United States government to be more open and transparent. » Read more

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Leadership, culture, and innovation: A chat with Cheryl McKinnon

Do the cultures of proprietary companies impede innovation? Do open source companies need a different sort of leadership? I've got my theories, but I don't have much to compare it to from my own experiences. I've been at Red Hat, a very open culture, for seven years and did a two-year tour at Alcatel before that. So I caught up with Cheryl McKinnon, Chief Marketing Officer at Nuxeo, an open source enterprise content management company, to explore open culture, leadership, and history. » Read more

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Community-building tip: surprise is the opposite of engagement

In the interview with Chris Blizzard I posted last week, near the end of the article Chris attributes a phrase to Mozilla CEO John Lilly:

"Surprise is the opposite of engagement."

This may be one of the most simple, brilliant things I have ever heard someone say when it comes to creating engaged, active communities. » Read more

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The Wikimedia Foundation: doing strategic planning the open source way

Earlier this week I wrote a post about some of the cultural challenges Wikipedia is facing as its contribution rate has slowed. The comments you made were fantastic, including one by Dr. Ed H Chi (the PARC scientist who published the study I referred to in the post) linking to a prototype dashboard his team created to showcase who is editing each Wikipedia page (totally fascinating—you have to go try it!) » Read more

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The Apple exception: where open innovation theory breaks down

Over the last few weeks, I've noticed more folks pointing out a paradox that has been driving me nuts. As many companies embrace open innovation and culture, there is one incredibly successful holdout: Apple. Three articles on the subject here, here, and here. » Read more

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Open Thread Thursday | Business: Can the truth really set you free?

There's a lot of talk about openness and transparency in the world of business these days. So we wanted to ask: What does it really mean to be an open company? Where are you seeing companies act in a more open way? And where do you think companies can benefit most from transparency?

We'd love to hear your stories. Share your thoughts below. You can also discuss them with us on the freenode IRC channel #opensource.com. » Read more

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An interview with Dr. Tony O'Driscoll of Duke University's Fuqua School of Business (part II)

Prior to your academic career, you worked for 18 years within companies like IBM and Nortel, so you've had ample opportunity to observe from different perspectives the evolution toward “openness” in business. How is management coping with the shift toward open principles like meritocracy and open innovation? » Read more

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GlaxoSmithKline announces open innovation plans

Forbes reports that pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline announced a plan to beginning collaborating with other companies on research into drugs for diseases that don't get a lot of attention, malaria being a key example. It sounds like open innovation in action. Read the Forbes article here, but here's a key quote: » Read more

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