participation

How to analyze corporate contributions to open source projects

Analyzing corporate contributions

In proprietary software, the company contributes 100% of the code. If you think about a traditional proprietary software product, it has a development community of one: the software company itself. The company’s ability to support that product, to influence the features that come in future versions, and to integrate that product with other products in its ecosystem flows directly from its direct control over the source code and its development.

In open source, it is rare that any one company controls anything close to 100% of the source code; in fact, it is often a sign of a weak open source community if one company dominates a project. The power and the value of the open source development model come from many individual and corporate contributors coming together. Using this thinking, we can look at the collaborative corporate contributions to OpenStack. » Read more

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OpenHatch brings open source to campus

OpenHatch brings open source to campus

A little less than a year ago, I was asked to direct OpenHatch's Open Source Comes to Campus event series. This event is a workshop designed to introduce college students to open source, to teach them how to use tools like version control and issue trackers, and to guide them through making their first contributions. When I joined, OpenHatch was averaging two events a year. I was asked, hopefully, if I could run seven events in 2013. » Read more

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Calling all open source gurus

participation in Opensource.com

On Opensource.com in 2011 we launched our points and badge system. Many of our readers log in daily, vote on and rate articles, add their comments, and participate in polls—all while earning points for their activity. Recent feedback from our community moderators and other community members has been that there are a few gaps in the system, which is currently: » Read more

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Participation value and sustainability through the lens of American Idol

open source communities

Whether in the US or abroad, most everyone is familiar with American Idol. While not an open source project or community, American Idol is a good example of the power of participation, and how understanding this power and providing value can be profitable. American Idol has perfected the art of inspiring millions of people to work together toward one end goal—and the show has made millions. So, how do you get people to participate in something for free and make money from it?

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Open source to bridge the global digital divide

open source bridge digital divide

I vividly remember my first experience using the Internet in 2000. The amount of information I was hit with by typing my first search term, university, was far beyond my wildest imaginations. This plethora of knowledge filled my mind with wonder, excitement, and enlightenment. I suddenly had the power to read, analyze, and learn about anything and anyone. The knowledge created by some of the greatest minds in the history of mankind was at my disposal, free of cost and just one single click away. I felt empowered.

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The rise of the citizen CIO

What is a citizen CIO?

Are citizen CIOs a threat to local governments or a blessing in disguise? With government IT departments producing more open data and participation from community interest groups and citizens on the rise, we’re beginning to see the start of a new movement within open government: telling our government which technologies to deploy. Citizens are identifying—and some are creating themselves—the next wave of applications and resources for their municipalities, such as a crowdsourced answering platform for city services, an open data catalog, and a civic infrastructure adoption website for fire hydrants and storm drains. With this, the role of the citizen CIO is beginning to emerge. » Read more

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On a mission to change the citizen experience

The Dave and Gunnar Show

In this episode of the Dave and Gunnar Show, I interviewed opensource.com's lead project manager, Jason Hibbets. He recently self-published a book advocating for citizen involvement in local government and shared with us how it's changing everything.

Listeners get insight into how the open source way is shaping how citizens influence change and progress in cities across the US. Jason also shares tips for self-publishing with Lulu.com, how to run a successful crowdfunding campaign, steps for planning your own unconference, like CityCamp, and how he got started with Code for America.

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The five elements of an open source city

open source city

How can you apply the concepts of open source to a living, breathing city? An open source city is a blend of open culture, open government policies, and economic development.

I derived these characteristics based on my experiences and while writing my book, The foundation for an open source city.

Characteristics such as collaboration, participation, transparency, rapid prototyping, and many others can be applied to any city that wants to create an open source culture. Let's take a look at these characteristics in more detail. » Read more

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Bring openness to your local government with Code Across America

Code Across America

Code Across America is scheduled for February 22-24. It will be a weekend of community building and moving the needle for more openness in local governments across the United States.

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Could open source build a jetliner?

open source jet

I know this might sound like an odd question. It first came up in a conversation I had with Gary Hamel, the eminent business thinker and one of the first people to recognize the importance of distributed co-creation and that it will change management in the 21st century. We were discussing how the power of participation could replace traditional management for purposes of coordination and what it's limits might be. We ended up using the analogy of building a jetliner as our best example of where tight coordination is required. This question has been nagging on my mind ever since. » Read more

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