participatory government

Five essential elements of an open government unconference

Five essential elements of an open government unconference

Joining the open source (and CityCamp) movement has been one of the best experiences of my life. I've been involved with open source for over a decade, but I never got involved in a community project in any significant way--until I found CityCamp. I haven't submitted a single line of code, but I'm able to bring my project management and community-building skills to the table. That's important because it highlights the fact that there is more to open source contributions than writing code. » Read more

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Get Satisfaction: Tips for engaging citizens in gov 2.0

When we talk about open government technology, it’s often in terms of open data, open source software, social media or crowd-sourced ideation and 311 tools. What’s rarely discussed is a truly open, transparent and comprehensive platform where citizens can comment or ask government questions and get direct assistance from public servants or even their own fellow citizens. » Read more

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Did you #askobama?

I participated in the first-ever Twitter @townhall meeting hosted by the White House on July 7. Of course, I wanted to see if my questions would make it to the big screen, but I was more interested in the participation and transparency of the event. » Read more

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Creating a citizen movement for open government

How do you get techies, govies, and citizens to identify, collaborate, and start creating solutions for your local government? Host a CityCamp.

It's easier than you think. The first CityCamp Raleigh started as a conversation about citizen engagement, but we realized that we could do more than just talk about it. A dozen people came together over 12 weeks to make CityCamp Raleigh a reality. Over 225 people attended three days of collaboration, sharing, and encouraging openness--focusing on improving access to data and solutions for local government. » Read more

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Economics of Participatory Government: The Coming (temporary) Scarcity

I’ll admit, it’s a bit of a sensational headline. But if I put the word “equilibrium” in there, you might not have reached this point.

Last year while presenting at a technology and disabilities conference, I answered a question about participatory government, gov 2.0, so on, in a way that reverberated in tones of heresy on the faces of some people.

I said something to the effect of: “There are people who don’t want to participate. We have a representative democracy and people paid to run things, and in many cases I want them to do their jobs and let me do mine.”
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