procurement

Italy is latest to promote open source software in public procurements

open source software in government

In December, the Italian government issued final rules implementing a change to procurement law that now requires all public administrations in the country to first consider re-used or free software before committing to proprietary licenses. Importantly, the new rules include an enforcement mechanism, which can, at least in theory, annul decisions that do not follow these procedures. » Read more

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Hacking government procurement with a new RFP

duplication

If you’re familiar with any type of government procurement process, it usually involves an RFP—a request for proposal. But today, with declining revenues and limited resources, the approach to partnerships and getting work done may change within government in the near future. I forsee a shift from the traditional RFP process to a request for partnership. » Read more

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FOSS satisfies government regulations

foss networking

Talend, a licensor of open source enterprise software, has recently received a ruling from the U.S. Customs Service corroborating that its software complies with the Trade Agreements Act of 1979 (19 USC 2511 et seq.) Open source software adoption by the U.S. Federal government must comply with many regulations, some of which can be difficult given the nature of modern software development. And these rules are frequently used as a barrier, or a bar, to the use of FOSS in federal government procurement. One of these issues is the ability of the FOSS company to certify compliance with the TAA which requires a product to be manufactured or substantially transformed in the United States or a designated country. » Read more

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The next generation of open source software procurement models

The next generation of open source software procurement models

Swedish Framework Agreement Overcomes FUD, Inertia, Risks and Other Barriers

One year ago, the new Swedish framework agreement for the procurement of open source became active. Five suppliers were contracted to provide software and services. Central government, the public educational sector, all twenty county councils, and 225 out of the 290 Swedish municipalities are participating. They call off mini competitions for contracts the suppliers then have to battle for. This model differs from the recommendations made in the European 'Guideline on public procurement of Open Source Software', aiming to overcome current barriers and increase the use of open source.

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Pushing for open data? 3 steps to consider

Pushing for open data? 3 steps to consider

Open Data is fast becoming a ‘hot topic’ in government. I’m proud to see my colleagues & fellow open gov supporters helping governments around the world launch their cloud-powered open data catalogues: from the Government of Columbia and the European Union, to the Canadian cities of Regina, SK and Medicine Hat, AB. But it’s not all, as they say, Sunshine, Lollipops and Rainbows.

My recent involvement with the failed Open Data resolution in Milton, Ontario caused me to re-think some of the basics for a successful open data initiative. Taken from a municipal open data initiative perspective, the 3 steps below will help make an open data, open government or open data motion stick:

» Read more

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OpenForum Europe finds trademark references in IT procurements widespread, break rules

OpenForum Europe finds increase in IT procurement trademarks references

Report: 'Contracting authorities must take exit costs into account'

Public administrations that are procuring IT services and software must add to the budget plan the exit costs needed to move to alternative IT solutions after the end of the contract period. That is one of the recommendations by Open Forum Europe, an organisation advocating the use of open standards in ICT, in a report on procurement published this Monday.

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Levelling the playing field for procurement of open source solutions

Levelling the playing field for procurement of open source solutions

The software market has changed. Government entities and the corporate market are now embracing open source software like never before, primarily for its twin attributes of cost-effectiveness and flexibility. IT departments are more educated on the risks and benefits, and now routinely use open source applications within large, mission-critical systems. In parallel, an innovative marketplace has emerged, delivering a range of services such as implementation, maintenance and customisation of open source software. Forward thinking governments have developed policy positions to encourage departments to harness the benefits of an increasing pool of mature enterprise-level open source software. » Read more

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Two countries, separated by a common IT market

Two countries, separated by a common IT market

The UK Cabinet Office has made no secret of its enthusiasm for open source software. They've provided a Government Action Plan, included open source in their ICT Strategy, and even provided an Open Source Procurement Toolkit for government buyers. They see the same benefits as their US counterparts: a more competitive software market, more innovation, more interagency collaboration, fewer silos, better security, and more opportunities for domestic software development firms. The UK, however, hasn't yet seen the kind of open source adoption we have in the United States despite similar challenges and similar market conditions. » Read more

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The Open Source Procurement Toolkit: Still crippled by "free"

The Open Source Procurement Toolkit: Still crippled by "free"

The recent release of the Open Source Procurement Toolkit by the Cabinet Office has been interesting and encouraging, even if it did stir in me a certain scepticism that things will be different this time round. Under both Labour and Conservative administrations, the Cabinet Office has been tasked with increasing the adoption of open source by government departments, and each time a fine statement has been made that has resulted in very little change. » Read more

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GOSCON: Open source beyond cutting costs

GOSCON: Open source beyond cutting costs

The Government Open Source Conference, masterfully curated by Deb Bryant and the good people at the Oregon State University Open Source Lab, is one of my favorite open source events. Every year, they manage to pull together quality speakers from innovative agencies and projects in a warm, collaborative, and exciting environment.

Before the earthquake unpleasantness later in the day, I was able to was able to catch the "Cutting Costs" session. Alex Howard of O'Reilly ("The hardest working man in Gov 2.0") moderated a panel discussion between » Read more

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