public domain

Creative Commons enables the return of the game Glitch

open source game art and code

If you never had a chance to play the delightful Flash-based MMO game Glitch—soon to be rescued from the pit of dead games thanks to Creative Commons assets—I'll let its new tenders explain: » Read more

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Download Nick Liow's Open Game Art Bundle

game on teamwork

Indie videogame designer Nick Liow launched the Open Game Art Bundle in June this year. It was a simple idea: independent videogame designers contribute game assets—animations, soundtracks, character designs—and customers can pay any price they want to access them.

Nick describes it as a sort of cross between Kickstarter and Humble Bundle, and like Humble Indie Bundle, the income is split between the developers themselves and charities (including Creative Commons). But there was one big twist: if the bundle reached its goal of $10,000 by July 15, all assets would become public domain under the CC0 public domain declaration.

Well, it did—raising $12,088 from 744 backers. That means you can now download all the packages in this bundle.

» Read more

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Review of the new Digital Public Library of America

digital literacy

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) opened last month.

(The official launch had been planned to occur at the Boston Public Library but the temporary closing of the library due to the Boston Marathon tragedy prompted that event to be postponed until the fall.)

The aim of the DPLA is to provide a large-scale, national public digital library of America's archives, libraries, museums, and cultural institutions into one portal. Leaders from 42 of America's institutions have contributed to the project, from ARTstor to the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Virginia Library. The idea of a national digital library harks to the early 1990s and the desire to provide a single portal to make cultural and scientific information available to all. It was conceived as a non-commercial alternative to Google's proposed digital library or an American equivalent to the European Union's Europeana digital library

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Why the public domain matters

digital content

[The public domain] is the basis of our self-understanding as expressed by our shared knowledge and culture. It is the raw material from which new knowledge is derived and new cultural works are created. [..] Having a healthy and thriving Public Domain is essential to the social and economic well-being of our societies."

—from The Public Domain Manifesto

The Public Domain Review is a proponent of this message and actively supports other institutions in opening up their digital works to the public domain. Today, the public domain is in danger of being locked up by private companies and institutions who want to try to resell access and reproduction rights to the copies that they make.

» Read more

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The Supreme Court's Golan decision gives short shrift to the public domain

The Supreme Court's Golan decision gives short shrift to the public domain

In a decision that favored the 1% (copyright owners) over the 99% (consumers and the public domain), the U.S. Supreme Court recently held that neither the Patent and Copyright Clause of the U.S. Constitution nor the First Amendment prohibits the removal of works from the public domain. Golan v. Holder, No. 10-545. Prior blog coverage of the case: certiorari granted and the 10th Circuit opinion. » Read more

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Poll: How long should copyrights last?

After you vote, chime in on the comments with your thoughts on copyrights and why you voted the way you did.

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Golan v. Holder: The future of fair use in education

When it considers Golan v. Holder in the coming months, the United States Supreme Court could potentially put an end to a decade-long copyright battle whose outcome significantly affects educators' abilities to use public domain works. In the process, it will wrestle with a thorny question of copyright's power: Is removing works from the United States public domain—and bringing them back under copyright's umbrella—constitutional? » Read more

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Creative Commons plaintext licenses and using CC0 for software

Creative Commons posted two pieces to their blog today regarding their licenses, and in particular, CC0, the Creative Commons public domain notice.

Plaintext versions of Creative Commons licenses

The Creative Commons licenses are now available in plaintext form: » Read more

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Transparency in energy usage

I'm pretty passionate about renewable energy. After I read Thomas L. Friedman's "Hot, Flat, and Crowded" I was sold on higher prices for gas and putting solar panels on every roof in America. In fact, I was so eager to contribute, I had 18 solar panels installed on the roof of my home.

When I was checking out the energy infographic, "Interactive Transparency: America's Energy, Where It's From and How It's Used" over at GOOD, I was re-energized on the topic of renewable and sustainable energy.

I couldn't agree more with GOOD's opening statement: » Read more

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Open*Life: 2010 in review

What a great year on the Open*Life channel here at opensource.com. We had more than 150 posts covering how open source touches our lives. This is our year in review--a time to reflect on what happened over the last year and a chance to look forward to next year.

I'd first like to thank all the authors and readers who contributed articles, thoughts, comments, reviews, artwork, feedback, and all the work that goes on behind the scenes to post an article on the site. It's truly a community effort. We are always looking for new authors, ideas for content, and improvement.

In 2011, we are looking to cover more topics on open source in our lives. We look forward to hearing more of your ideas. Let's take a look back at 2010 and see our top 10 posts, a few of my favorites, and my editor picks. » Read more

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