research

DARPA government research agency publishes catalog of open source projects

catalog of open source projects

The Defense Advance Reseach Project Agency (DARPA) is one of the government-sponsored research agencies that most boldly explores the future of science and technology. Given that many of its research projects have military applications, it has been traditional for the agency to be secretive about them. In recent years, however, DARPA has been embracing the benefits of open source, particularly for promoting rapid innovation. Last week, the agency opened to the public a new portal featuring a catalog all its open source projects.

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Release early, release often in scientific research

Release early, release often in scientific research

Why don't academics discuss research before starting the work?

In a recent blog postJack Kelly asked this simple question, and it is a striking one for those of us who are familiar with collaborating at high levels as part of an open source community. One of the pillars of the open source way is rapid prototyping and the idea of: release early, release often.

In the scientific research community, however, the history of and current state of affairs is closed and secretive. Jack Kelly even began his post with:

Warning: this is a hopelessly idealistic proposal...

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Exploring sustainable software for science

open source software for science

The first workshop on "Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experience," was held at the Supercomputing Conference in Denver, CO on November 17, 2013. This meeting was organized by the Software Sustainability Institute at the University of Edinburgh and the National Science Foundation to examine how we can create sustainable software platforms that can best serve the needs of scientific research. » Read more

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Beware of security vulnerabilities: What you don't know can come back to haunt you

security vulnerabilities

With all the benefits of open source, improper management of its use may result in substantial legal, business, and technical risks. Most research and design managers know that they have to manage open source licenses, but not many are monitoring for security vulnerabilities and other bugs in open source libraries they use.

Do you know the importance of monitoring open source for vulnerabilities before, during, and after using it?

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Open access to scientific knowledge has reached its tipping point

compete or collaborate?

A recent study funded by the European Commission and undertaken by analysts at Science-Metrix, a Montreal-based company that assesses science and technology organizations, has concluded that half of all published academic papers become freely available in no more than two years.

According to the study, the year 2011 is a milestone for open access. By this analysis, 50% of all scientific articles published in 2011 are currently available in some open access form or another, and the trend is toward more and more articles becoming open access.

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Could California bill mandate open access to research?

open thread on open access

Champions of open access to publicly funded academic research had something to celebrate last week. Creative Commons is reporting (with just a touch of cautious optimism) the progress of California's Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Act (AB 609, for short), which has successfully moved through the State's Assembly Appropriations Committee and is ready for a vote. » Read more

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Rapid development of citizen cyberscience projects on Crowdcrafting.org

Crowdsourcing science, open science

We are excited to announce the official launch of Crowdcrafting.org, an open source software platform—powered by our Pybossa technology—for developing and sharing projects that rely on the help of thousands of online volunteers. » Read more

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A neuro-hacker tells us why opening up scientific research is critical

open source why

Pete Herzog began an article he wrote for opensource.com last year about Hacker Highschool by saying:

It might sound strange, but every industry and profession could benefit from an employee as creative, resourceful, and motivated as a hacker. 

You see, Pete is not only motivated by what open source and open thinking can do to change our world, he is moved by it. He tell us that his passions change every few years, but always revolve around open source. 

Right now, he's working on an open source project called: Smarter Safer Better, a study and research (what he calls, neuro-hacking) on trust. Read more about his work on the subject: What They Don't Teach You in "Thinking Like the Enemy" Classes and Mind Control.

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New leaders in science are those who share

fortune cookie

The Obama administration recently responded to a petition asking the government to "require free access over the Internet to scientific journal articles arising from taxpayer-funded research."

I first heard about the petition on Google+, and am very proud to be signature #52. Back then 25,000 signatures seemed like a tall order for what is a somewhat niche area. In the end, the petition gained over 65,000 signatures and an official response from the White House. The Open Science Federation posted a screen capture of the 25,000th signature landmark on June 3, 2012. John Wilibanks started the petition with signature #1.

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Creative Commons license liberates knowledge of ESIP community

lightning talk

Erin Robinson, the Information and Virtual Community Director for the Foundation for Earth Science, the management arm of the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (@ESIPFed), says that earth science matters to all of us. For example, when Hurrican Sandy devastated areas of the country, responders needed information on flood zones and what hospitals were available.

ESIP is a cross-cutting community of application developers,
researchers, and big data centers comprised of about 1000 technology practitioners working together on common issues around earth science data and information. In order to support member contributions and collaborative work, ESIP built a non-traditional publishing platform, the ESIP Commons, which organizes member-produced content. Beyond structured input, the ESIP Commons also provides the option to license under Creative Commons and a suggested citation allowing community recognition and easy material reuse. Recently, the Data Citation Guidelines for Data Providers and Archives were picked up and resued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF)—a huge success.

The Drupal installation profile for the ESIP Commons will be available on Github in the coming weeks. And if you are interested in repurposing the Commons for your own group, please contact Erin at erinrobinson@esipfed.org.

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