research - Page number 2

Event report: FOSDEM introduces science-focused devroom

on the scene

FOSDEM, held annually in Brussels, Belgium, is a free event for open source communities to meet, share ideas, and collaborate. It offers a mix of focused devrooms and themed main track talks, with no requirement for registration. It has a reputation of being highly developer-focused, this year brought together over 5,000 geeks from around the world.

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A time for action: One student's commitment to free and open access

good bad ugly

Information is power. But like all power, there are those who want to keep it for themselves.—Aaron Swartz

I have been a PhD student for less than two years. On the other hand, for six years, I have been a member of the free culture movement, which emphasizes the importance of access to and openness of technology and information. » Read more

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Values of science at odds with desire to turn it into a commercial product

creativity

Scientific software tools have long lived in the conflict zone between open source ideals and proprietary exploitation. The values of science (openness, transparency, and free exchange) are at odds with the desires of individuals and organizations to transition scientific tools to a commercial product. This has been a problem in neuropsychology and neuroscience for decades, and extends outside the bounds of software.

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Protests demonstrate growing demand for open access to research

protests demand open access to academic research

Last week, Winston Hide committed what he called "a toxic career move." Hide, an associate professor of bioinformatics and computational biology at the Harvard School of Public Health, publicly resigned from the editorial board of Genomics, an influential journal in his field. » Read more

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Examining comments: A podcast with Peter DePasquale

Examining comments: A podcast with Peter DePasquale

The SIGCSE community (ACM Special Interest Group in Computer Science Education) is fairly large and quite diverse. Computing educators from all across the world and all levels (K-16+) gather to discuss tools, techniques, and research that might inform our work as techers of computing. 

At the intersection of tools and research lies the Comment Mentor (COMTOR) project, which is led by Peter DePasquale, an Associate Professor of Computer Science at The College of New Jersey. The COMTOR project combines Peter's passions at the intersection of computer science education research and the development of robust, distributed applications in the cloud. » Read more

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Research reveals value of gender diversity in open source communities

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Open source research often paints the community as a homogeneous landscape. I have collected stories from open source contributors to begin constructing a new narrative of diverse experience. These contributors are 20 women and men, living in seven countries. » Read more

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The potential for Project REALISE

We got a chance to catch up with some of the folks behind Project REALISE. REALISE is an acronym that stands for Refining and learning from online tools for Internet shared enterprise. The project focuses on accessibility and ease-of-use in the field of assistive technology, and has made breakthroughs in the education, employment, and health sectors. The key, they say, is finding the right partnerships.

Lately, they've been adding to their idea lab and incubator, while growing their community and getting ready for others to participate. Dr. Mike Wald, Senior Lecturer at the University of Southampton, is part of the core project team. He is a principal investigator and conducts research into accessible technologies for the project.

Dr. Wald was happy to help us understand how Project REALISE is primed to make the world more accessible. » Read more

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How open access to research benefits us all

Nearly a decade after the launch of the open access Malaria Journal, the publication released a report about how open access has impacted the study of malaria. Launched in 2002 as the only scientific journal devoted exclusively to malaria research, Malaria Journal became a top ranked journal for tropical medicine within just a few years.1 » Read more

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Open access overview: Focusing on open access to peer-reviewed research articles and their preprints

This is an introduction to open access (OA) for those who are new to the concept. It doesn't cover every nuance or answer every objection, but it should cover enough territory to prevent the misunderstandings that delayed progress in our early days. » Read more

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Five questions about open innovation, open source, and NASA with Molly Dix of RTI

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to meet Molly Dix and Jeff Cope, who run the Open Innovation Advisory Services group at RTI. For those not familiar with RTI, it is one of the world's preeminent research institutes, founded by a group of scientists in 1958 and now employing almost 3000 people helping businesses and governments in more than 40 countries around the world. » Read more

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