sharing - Page number 3

Public policy: The big opportunity for health record data

Public policy: The big opportunity for health record data

A few weeks ago Colin Hansen - a politician in the governing party in British Columbia (BC) - penned an op-ed in the Vancouver Sun entitled Unlocking our data to save lives. It's a paper both the current government and opposition should read, as it is filled with some very promising ideas.

In it, he notes that BC has one of the best collections of health data anywhere in the world and that, data mining these records could yield patterns - like longitudinal adverse affects when drugs are combined or the correlations between diseases - that could save billions as well as improve health care outcomes. » Read more

0 Comments

Your mother was right, so send her an e-card

Your mother was right

Your mother was right--about a lot of things most likely--but we think your mother was right because she always told you it is better to share. Sharing is a very important part of the open source way, so tell your lovely mom thanks for teaching you values like sharing with this e-card.

» Read more

0 Comments

Do you use Creative Commons licenses?

Do you use Creative Commons licenses?

Creative Commons provides a set of copyright licenses and tools "that give everyone from individual creators to large companies and institutions a simple, standardized way to keep their copyright while allowing certain uses of their work."

The idea is to make sharing on the Internet more straightforward and understandable, so people do it more. » Read more

8 Comments

Sharing the open source journey with Kansas City

Sharing the open source journey with Kansas City

The first half of CityCamp Kansas City was productive, collaborative, and eye-opening. The morning was overflowing with open source knowledge, the sharing of ideas, and expert talks. The event started with 14 lighting talks–a ton of information crammed into a five-minute talk.

More than 150 attendees learned about the Google Fiber initiative, spatial city mapping, SeeClickFix, Bike Walk KC, Open Missouri, and much more. Then I got to share the open source stories from Raleigh, NC in my presentation, "How open source is changing citizen engagement." [PDF] Based on the initial feedback from a few folks, it was inspiring and "sparked the individual/collective imagination." » Read more

0 Comments

The power of the 1 and how open innovation changed global health

How global health was changed with open innovation

[The following is the speech text for the keynote I gave at the SwitchPoint Conference April 20, 2012]

It is sometimes said that computer scientists worry about only three numbers: 0, 1, and N, where N tends to get very large. Sometimes such oversimplifications can lead to astonishing insights, such as the one that I had 25 years ago in June of 1987. » Read more

1 Comment

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on open source and "growing the pie"

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on open source and "growing the pie"

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) recently announced one of the most progressive open source policies in the US government. They reiterated the current OMB and DOD guidance by making open source commercial software, but they also went one step further: code they write is open by default. I am totally impressed. » Read more

0 Comments

A potter's community: Mother of innovation

A potter's community: Mother of innovation

One of the great things about being a potter is the way that experience, tools, and tips are shared by those who love the craft. At my first lesson at the potter's wheel, I was blown away by the way my peers (who were strangers at the time) invested in sharing knowledge with the newbies. The more experienced folk were always glad to lend a hand, students modeled the behavior of their teachers, and the class became less of a "follow my lead" and more of a "discover what works" session. » Read more

0 Comments

How open is too open?

How open is too open?

Last month, we posted a survey asking, "If you could open one of the following data sets tomorrow, which one would you open and why?" We got a great response–279 people voted and there were several comments.

One commenter remarked that we should have made it multiple choice, avoiding an all-or-nothing outcome. And another pointed out that 'non-classified government data' could include private personal information--like tax records, for example. So, as always, how we ask these questions is incredibly important. » Read more

0 Comments

OpenROV: Open source robotics seek sharing, travel, gold

OpenROV: Open source robotics seek sharing, travel, gold

OpenROV is a project that provides plans and software for a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Currently, it's a series of prototypes, with the goal of a fully-realized design of an underwater exploration device.

It was originally created to explore Hall City Cave in northern California. The cave has a lake where robbers supposedly dropped gold. The ROV has made a successful journey into the lake, although it hasn’t yet struck gold. » Read more

2 Comments

Open Video Conference: Sharing more through open video

Open Video Conference: Sharing more through open video

For the past three years, I've attended the Open Video Conference in New York City, and in that short time the conference has not only grown in attendance, but the conversations being had there have changed quite a bit as well. What began as many small conversations about codecs, file types, and open source video software have now evolved into a much larger conversation around how content creators and educators are seeking ways to leverage the power of video to share their stories and open up their dialogues with the world. » Read more

0 Comments