transparency - Page number 2

Six ways to improve meetings using open source principles

intelligent swarming

The path to collaboration is usually paved with the best intentions. We all know too well that this can happen when a meeting is called. A bad one can completely derail needed work, but a good one can leave a team feeling energized, even excited. 

You can't control every meeting you're in, but you can improve the ones you run. Is anybody thinking about how to do this? Let's Google it: How to have a useful meeting. » Read more

0 Comments

Beth Noveck predicts two phases of open government in TED Talk

A new dawn

I recently watched a new TED Talk by the first and former White House Deputy CTO Beth Noveck, delivered in Edinburgh, Scotland. She is really the initial instigator of the modern open government movement in the United States and is now working to make it a reality worldwide. What I like best about her talk is the litany of examples that are happening all over the world—from painting the national budget on hundreds of walls so that locals can comment on it to a Texas wiki that lets citizens and businesses comment on regulations. Take a look:

» Read more

0 Comments

One year later, delivering on the commitments of the open government partnership

transparency

September 20th marks the one-year anniversary of the launch of the global Open Government Partnership (OGP) and the release of the U.S. National Action Plan detailing the Obama administration's commitments to strengthen transparency in the federal government. The partnership and the administration's implementation efforts have both made significant progress toward their goal of more open and responsive governments in the U.S. and worldwide.

» Read more

0 Comments

Community Spotlight: Andrew Krzmarzick, enabling open source and empowering citizens in government

five questions with an opensource contributor

As the Community Manager of GovLoop—a highly active online community connecting more than 50,000 public sector professionals—Andrew Krzmarzick suspects his role is pretty similar to leading an open source project.

The open source way guides the company's decisions, communications, and interactions. And open source solutions enable them to empower citizens around the country (and the world!) who don't want to wait for their cities to make updates to a page or build apps and resources that makes their lives easier.

Hear Andrew speak more on this at the 2012 National Conference for Government Webmasters this year on September 11th in Kansas City. He will discuss citizen generated initiatives—Hackathons, CityCamps, LocalWiki and Facebook pages—that provide the community with much needed, easy to navigate, web-based resources. » Read more

0 Comments

Sunlight Foundation's Eric Mill scouts out new developments in government

Transparency in government

Interested citizens and government professionals, meet your new pal, Scout. It sends you notifications when new developments in government happen—your government, your departments of interest, your items of relevance. 

We caught up with Scout's creator, Eric Mill, a web and mobile developer at Sunlight Foundation, to give us the details of the technology powering Scout and some explanation to why we thought this tool already existed.

Mill is an expert at developing technology that makes government more transparent and avid about open source projects.

» Read more

1 Comment

Scout: Sending you updates about government activity

Transparency in government

Recently, I created and launched a new website for the Sunlight Foundation called Scout. It's the product I'm the most proud of building in my three years there. It is essentially a search and notification engine for government action. Simple idea, simple presentation, and it's easy to compare to Google Alerts—but there's a lot underneath the hood. » Read more

0 Comments

HuffPost releases Pollster, an open source API for managing election polling, fostering transparency

Transparency

In case you haven't noticed, it's an election year in the United States. And with the election in full swing, there is a plethora of data, from a myriad of sources, about what is on the mind of the electorate, what is driving voters to make their decisions, and how they are likely to vote. » Read more

0 Comments

PolitwOOPs! Deleted tweets from politicians never die

Donkey elephant oops

A brief tweet from Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX) recently invited you to see her newly-decorated apartment and head-to-toe fashions. The problem? It wasn't her apartment. The link led to the website of a staffer in her press office and was promptly deleted from Twitter fifty-seven seconds later. Looks like someone got their social media accounts mixed up.

That might be the end of the story, except the gaffe lives on through Politwoops, an archive of deleted tweets from U.S. politicians hosted by the Sunlight Foundation. » Read more

4 Comments

New Media Commons white paper examines future of transparency in peer review

New Media Commons white paper examines future of transparency in peer review

The always-insightful Alex Reid has penned an essay "on the question of open peer review," which examines a draft white paper posted to Media Commons last week. » Read more

0 Comments

Open source is like falling in love

Open source is for lovers

I've always believed that the best things in life should come in open source packages. Openness is a natural synonym with selflessness and, thus, with love in its truest form. That's the analogy that instantly came to my mind after reading this article by Bryan Behrenshausen, which discusses ways to explain the concept of openness to your friends. » Read more

1 Comment