transparency - Page number 5

Success in the second year of the Open Hardware Summit

Success in the second year of the Open Hardware Summit

The Open Hardware Summit (OHS), now in its second year, brings together folks from all different backgrounds and truly represents a melting pot of those with interests in the open hardware (open source designs, firmware, software, process) movement. In fact, I’d argue that the open hardware movement is more inclusive than open source software is at this point. There are far more women attending and speaking at these events (OHS is even organized by women), combined with a lot less of the pretentious prima donnas you see in male-dominated open source software. » Read more

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Open For Business: The reputation economy of open source--do you take the egg roll?

Open For Business: The reputation economy of open source--do you take the egg ro

Open source software has been referred to as a "gift economy," one where valuable goods and services are exchanged without the expectation of payment. That’s fine, so far as it goes, but when it comes to businesses involved with open source software, I think the term "reputation economy” is more accurate. » Read more

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How to build an open data initiative for your city

How to build an open data initiative for your city

Montréal Ouvert is a citizens’ initiative to obtain a formal open data policy for the city of Montréal, Canada. Launched by four Montrealers in August 2010 to mobilize public and political support for the adoption of an open data policy for the city of Montreal, it has had considerable success. The online presence includes 567 Facebook Fans, 743 Twitter followers and tens of thousands of visits to its website. Over 1 year, Montréal Ouvert organised three public meetings, two hackathons, and presented at over 8 conferences – not to mention blogging, tweeting, report writing, media interviews and general communication in both official languages – no easy task! » Read more

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Z: The open source generation

Z: The open source generation

Generation Z is beginning to join the workforce. This age group--born between the early 1990s and early 2000s--has never really existed in a world without the web or lacking the widespread use of cell phones, laptops, and freely available wireless networks and digital media.

The combination of job changes caused by technology’s impact and the employment issues that come with an economic recession makes finding work a very different experience for Generation Z--vastly different what their parents, grandparents, or even siblings went through. And the workplace is finding that dealing with these hyper-connected Internet-generation “kids” greatly changes the game. » Read more

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Mozilla: A study in organizational openness

My theme this week is organizational openness and transparency and today I'd like to highlight a fantastic example of an organization that has built a culture with openness at its core: Mozilla.

Most of you probably know Mozilla as the organization famous for its open source Firefox web browser. But what you may not know is that open source is more than just a technology decision for Mozilla; the open source way is deeply ingrained in every aspect of its culture. » Read more

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SPARKcon: Igniting creative thinkers with open source

SPARKcon: Organizing creative thinkers with open source

How do you celebrate the creativity of your community without falling into a rigid planning process? You open source it. By tapping into individuals' passions, their willingness to collaborate, and creating a culture of transparency, you can light a spark that will inspire unpredictable--yet reproducible--results. » Read more

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How open and transparent can a public company really be?

Here on opensource.com, we often talk about the benefits of an open, collaborative approach, and I see new stories every day that help showcase the benefits of an open organizational model.

But for public companies, the benefits of an open approach are often overshadowed by the risks. During my time at Red Hat (a publicly-traded company for much of my tenure), our approach was traditionally to "default to open," sharing as much information as we could, both inside the company and with the outside world. » Read more

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Mårten Mickos: "F" as in freedom, and in fun, and in the future

If you haven't heard a keynote about the wonders of the cloud, you haven't been to an open source conference lately. But Mårten Mickos' LinuxCon cloud keynote was more than that--it was really a freedom keynote.

"FOSS has an 'F' as in freedom, and in fun, and the future," Mickos said. "Many of us do it because of 'F' as in fun. But we have a duty to civilization to protect freedom--to protect that what we open, others don't close." » Read more

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Crowdsourced Icelandic constitution submitted to parliament

Last week, the Iceland Constitutional Council, made up of 25 Icelandic citizens, presented a bill to their parliament outlining a new constitution. The bill contains 114 articles in nine chapters, and includes elements for a more open government. It appears that the population will be given the chance to vote on the new constitution after the Alþingi (national parliament) reviews the draft.

In April 2011, Iceland decided to rewrite their constitution by crowdsourcing ideas and suggestions from the Internet. We've taken a look at the draft constitution and there are several articles that create a more open government for Iceland. » Read more

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