video games

How you can help encourage open source in the International Game Developers' Association

open source gaming

If you're at all interested in open source and video games, you've no doubt noticed that the two don't meet nearly as often as we'd like. But we saw Steam finally come to Linux last year. We have Ouya. We have more and more great Linux games appearing, and Linux gamers always give the Humble Bundles more support than Windows or Mac users. Thus it's also time to introduce open source and free culture to the International Game Developers Association (IGDA). Towards that goal, I'll be helping launch the Open Source and Free Culture SIG at the Game Developers Conference next week in San Francisco. » Read more

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Nothing To Hide: An anti-stealth game in which you are your own watchdog

open source game

Nothing To Hide is an "anti-stealth game," in which you must carry cameras and spy gear to live in a world of self-surveillance and self-censorship. A world where you're made to be your own watchdog. Released for The Day We Fight Back, the game is now seeking crowdfunding to complete the open source game—10% of what's raised will first go to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Demand Progress, and the Freedom of the Press Foundation. » Read more

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Download Nick Liow's Open Game Art Bundle

game on teamwork

Indie videogame designer Nick Liow launched the Open Game Art Bundle in June this year. It was a simple idea: independent videogame designers contribute game assets—animations, soundtracks, character designs—and customers can pay any price they want to access them.

Nick describes it as a sort of cross between Kickstarter and Humble Bundle, and like Humble Indie Bundle, the income is split between the developers themselves and charities (including Creative Commons). But there was one big twist: if the bundle reached its goal of $10,000 by July 15, all assets would become public domain under the CC0 public domain declaration.

Well, it did—raising $12,088 from 744 backers. That means you can now download all the packages in this bundle.

» Read more

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Young maker says Raspberry Pi is way to go

Raspberry Pi

A few weeks ago I was able to attend the Mini Maker Faire in Cleveland, Ohio where I got to meet with local makers and discuss a variety of subjects including Raspberry Pi, 3D Printing, and programming. One of the highlights of my trip there was meeting Dave and Lauren Egts. Lauren was there presenting on the Scratch Game she designed: The Great Guinea Pig Escape.

» Read more

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Get your application in for the Steam for Linux beta

Steam logo

The long-awaited beta test for Steam for Linux has arrived. There are only 1,000 spots available for testers, and Valve is looking for experienced Linux users. (I suspect if you can't answer the questions on the application, you probably don't qualify.) Valve also held an internal beta at the end of September.

» Read more

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Portal + Super Mario mashup Mari0 released

Mari0 logo

What happens when you bring together the joy of the past with the joy of the... well, more recent past? Mari0, a mashup of Portal and the original Super Mario Brothers.

Mario gets a portal gun and the game mechanics from Portal with four-player co-op in a scratch recreation of the Super Mario worlds. And if that's not enough, you can download extra mappacks and the level editor.

It's open source, free-as-in-beer, and available for Linux (as well as Windows and Mac). » Read more

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RIT STEM video game challenge hackathon

RIT STEM video game challenge hackathon

This post originally appeared on the Joan Ganz Cooney Center Blog. You can follow updates from the Cooney center via facebook, and twitter. » Read more

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How we almost lost Doom 3 and id for good

How we almost lost Doom 3 and id for good

For fans of both gaming and open source software, few major video game companies have been revered as id software, one of the only major game studios that has not only perpetually released game clients for Linux, but has also released the source code for many of their proprietary game engines. Admittedly, the source code is always released once the next generation of id's gaming engine was launched. » Read more

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Achievement unlocked: Four open consoles for homebrew gamers

Not long after Nintendo announced its newest handheld, the Nintendo 3DS, gamers began asking the perennial question: Would the device be region locked? And much to the dismay of would-be importers, the answer was an unambiguous "yes": Nintendo does indeed prohibit consoles sold in one geographic territory (like Japan) from playing video games purchased in another (say, the United States, Europe, or Australia). » Read more

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Steam for Linux confirmed (April Fool's Day)

Note: This is an old April Fool's post. But for real news, see this story from April 2012--Steam on Linux is expected by the end of the year.

I'm sorry. That post title was a cheap way to get you to read this, wasn't it? But since it's April Fool's Day, it seemed like the best time to talk about the greatest joke on Linux users--the eternal wait for Steam. » Read more

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