women in open source

Breaking down geek stereotypes in open source

I'm a newcomer to the tech industry. I don't have a degree in Computer Science or Engineering. I'm a writer by trade and training, so coming to work for Red Hat after years of freelancing and crappy office jobs was a real shock. Which is to say, a pleasant shock. Tattoos? Sure. Pink hair? Oh, yes. Start time? Whatever suits you best. And unlike other places I've worked, not a single man has expected me to make them a cup of coffee, and nobody tells me to "smile love, nobody likes a sadsack in the office!" (I frown when I concentrate. I'm sorry! And by that I mean I'm totally not sorry.) » Read more

65 Comments

What's the best entry point for women in computing? Open source.

open source computing

Leslie Hawthorn is the new community manager at Elastic Search, an open source real time data and analytics company, and a member of the program committee for the Grace Hopper conference that is held each year to increase "visibility for the contributions of women to computing." » Read more

0 Comments

Let your code speak for you

share your code

There are rapidly growing feature set, high commit rates, and code contributions happening across the globe to Apache Hadoop and related Apache Software Foundation projects. However, the number of woman developerscommitters, and Project Management Committee (PMC) members in this vast and diversified ecosystem are really diminutive. For the Hadoop project alone, only 5% out of 84 committers are women; and this has been the case for over the past 2 years. » Read more

1 Comment

Engage women, have fun, get more out of your open source project

women in open source

There are few women developers and even proportionately less working in open source communities. However, a career in OSS is ideal for women who are seeking balance in their lives whether the balance is starting a family or maintaining balance with friends and a strenuous and engaging hobby. It’s well established that there’s a shortage of women pursuing careers in computer science. UCLA’s Higher Education Research Institutefound that "The fraction of women among bachelor’s graduates in CS increased to 12.9 percent in 2011-12, compared to 11.7 percent in 2010-11." As few as 1.5% of open source contributors are women.  » Read more

24 Comments

Make money and have fun in open source

open source career

Women in open source. Women in programming. Women in tech at all. Where are they? » Read more

17 Comments

The Women of OpenStack talk outreach, education, and mentoring

open source conferences

In the open source world, a women-only event seems counter-intuitive. Yet I am finding reasons for such events the more I attend them.

At the OpenStack Summit, a twice-a-year event where OpenStack contributors get together to plan the next release, the Women of OpenStack group has set up events where we invite the women first. Men aren't excluded, but our hope is to get more OpenStack women together. I can hardly capture the value of getting together with other women in OpenStack at the Summit, but here goes. » Read more

4 Comments

Golden opportunity for public libraries to meet digital needs of women

learning open source at the library

Women use the Internet 17% more than their male counterparts yet are underrepresented in programming and open source. Public libraries (and public schools) have a critical role to play with improving the dearth of diversity in coding and open source.

Over the holidays, I completely lost my unlimited home Internet access, which caused me to reflect on life for those without unlimited home Internet access at all. When I finally had my Internet access restored and retrieved the messages about Opensource.com's Youth in Open Source Week (was held January 13- 17) and Women in Open Source Week (this week, January 27 - February 7), I felt like banging my head. » Read more

5 Comments

Open source events grow at the university

open source university

Catherine Dumas is a PhD student in the College of Computing and Information (CCI) at the University at Albany at the State University of New York (SUNY). She teaches two undergraduate courses, one in the Computer Science department and one in the Informatics Department.

Aside from her PhD work and teaching, Catherine is very involved in encouraging men and women to pursue their dreams in the field. She does this by staying active in the student chapter of the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIST) and in the activites going on at the College of Computing and Information Women in Technology (CCIWiT) group. Open source software is also a topic she's passionate about, and for the past three years she has helped organize the annual Open Source Festival at SUNY.

Read more in this interview.

» Read more

1 Comment

What I learned while editing Wikipedia

share knowledge

I was introduced to the Wikimedia movement primarily as a communications consultant for Wikimedia Foundation’s first Global South project that began in India in 2011. My work with the Wikimedia Foundation and editing Wikipedia has helped me take a hard look at myself as a woman of colour from India in technology. » Read more

12 Comments

Grace Hopper Open Source Day: register now!

Grace Hopper Open Source Day

Are you planning to attend this year’s Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing, taking place on October 2-5 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, US?

Created by the Anita Borg Institute, this annual conference is named for Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper, a pioneer in computing who worked on the first large-scale commercial computer—UNIVAC—and led the team that created the COBOL programming language.

» Read more

2 Comments