youth

The Digital Girl of the Year dreams of dancing with robots

digital girl of the year

Lune van Ewijk is ten years old and already a role model for kids and adults alike. Last year, she won the Digital Girl of the Year 2013 award from the European Commision, who had this to say about her:

Lune develops her own games and interactive movies, designs robots, and dreams of becoming an engineer. At ten years of age, she is already a true digital visionary and already has a track-record of getting girls her age excited about digital endeavour.

Her message to the world: be you and don't give up.

Lune is part of CoderDojo Belgium, where she has learned and practiced a variety of open source digital skills like programming in Scratch. In this interview find out more about CoderDojos, the work she's done, the award she's won, and what she sees in her future. » Read more

1 Comment

Young coder on Raspberry Pi, Scratch, and Gluster

share your code

Last year, Lauren Egts designed and programmed a game (The Great Guinea Pig Escape) using a youth-focused programming language called Scratch. She presented it at the 2013 Cleveland Mini Maker Faire where it caught the eye of Element14's David Hamblin. He was impressed, and in June, Opensource.com shared Lauren's interview with David about how she got started programming and what her dad, Dave Egts, thinks of her hobby. » Read more

0 Comments

On Europe's first Code Week with Irish Ambassador Julie Cullen

kids and teens in open source

The first Europe Code Week was held two months ago at schools and CoderDojos in 26 countries around Europe—Ireland and Croatia being the most active. The event was launched to help increase the knowledge shared with school-age children about coding, computer science, and technology by The Young Advisors (a group of young people dedicated to advancing a digital society working closely with the Vice President of the European Commission, Neelie Kroes).

During the events, kids from schools all over Europe used Scratch, Arduino boards, and other open source software and hardware to build thier projects (including robots)!  

Each country that took part in Europe Code Week appointed an Ambassador to lead their event. I reached out to Ireland’s Julie Cullen, a teacher at St. Oliver’s College, Drogheda, Co. Louth, to get her take on the event. In this interview, Julie shares just how excited the kids were to work with code and computers, what open source software they hacked on, and what projects got underway. She also tells us what’s in store for this year’s #codeEU 2014.

» Read more

2 Comments

Teens and their first job: How to get on the path to a happy career

open source jobs

I grew up in the 1980s in Columbus, Georgia. You needed a car to get around, so I did not work until I could drive. Within months of getting my driver's license, I got my first job as a part-time computer programmer for a stockbroker.

It is easy to forget that in the 80s, computers and programming were not nearly as pervasive (or popular) as they are today. I had been interested in computers for a couple of years by then. My prized possession was my Kaypro II with 64K RAM and dual floppies. Part-time jobs using computers were rare, so I felt lucky to find the perfect fit. I was tasked with building a computer program that would perform contact management, tracking interactions with potential and current clients. I wish I understood the value of such a system back then. Good thing Marc Benioff did. (Thank you, Salesforce.com.)

I ended up working with the stockbroker for more than two years until I went to college. I learned several very valuable lessons. » Read more

5 Comments