Education

Open Source: Modernizing India's education system

Over the last few years, open source adoption has been growing within India's education system. Five years ago, the South Indian state of Kerala, pioneered open source in schools with its famous IT@Schools project, that now covers three million students from the 5th-10 standards, involves 200,000 teachers across 4071 schools. Since then, other Indian states like Karnataka, Gujarat, Assam, West Bengal and others have made open source a key part of their school education initiatives. » Read more

8 Comments

Can you Moodle me now?

In its 10 year history, Moodle has been confined to computer screens around the world; with countless fields, description areas and scrolling filling the screen.  There have been attempts at mobilizing Moodle in the past, but as a user you either didn't have the time to use it or it simply wasn't worth using.  With the proliferation and widespread availability of web-capable phones, however, mobile customers worldwide now have in hand a versatile portal into the web and to Moodle. » Read more

4 Comments

Allegheny first-years dive into Fedora

This semester, a colleague and I have been running a parallel set of freshman seminar courses. Darren Miller (a photography professor in the Art Department) is teaching a course titled Art and Activism, and mine is titled Technology and Activism. These topical courses are part of an Allegheny student's introduction to writing and presentation skills—and we decided to take that to another level this semester. » Read more

4 Comments

Can Professors Teach Open Source?

At teachingopensource.org, we think so, and we wrote a book to help.  The following excerpt comes from the Foreword of our new textbook, Practical Open Source Software Exploration, which is licensed under Creative Commons BY-SA-3.0.  It's a book that works like an open source software project.  In other words: patches welcome.
» Read more

13 Comments

The Secret Lives of Faculty: Background

I submitted a proposal for a talk to OSCON titled "The Secret Lives of Faculty." The Twitterable blurb went like this:

This presentation will introduce open source practitioners to the secret lives of computing faculty in higher education. We will introduce the kinds of students we teach, the curricula we teach to, and the metrics by which we are evaluated.

This post will be the first in a series that explores this topic. The goal is to provide a starting point for dialog and debate about how to best encourage and support faculty in higher education as they consider how best to leverage open source in their classrooms.

» Read more

0 Comments

CSH Seminar Series: Karlie Robinson

Karlie Robinson, a Rochester local and open source entrepreneur, gave a short talk at RIT about open source and business as a part of the Computer Science House (CSH) Seminar Series.  This year, CSH has hosted speakers such as Kevin Purdy, contributing editor of Lifehacker, and Charles Profitt, of the Rochester Linux User Group (LUGOR), which meets regularly at Rochester » Read more

0 Comments

Openness and the US National Educational Technology Plan

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has announced the National Education Technology Plan.  For the first time, the Obama strategy for education is spelled out in great detail -- and at its heart is a deep reliance upon open infrastructure and open educational resources.  For those who believe in the power of open source to transform education, the plan is essential reading.
» Read more

2 Comments

The Course-to-Co-op Lifecycle: OpenInnovation@RIT

There are many reasons to pursue a college education, but getting a good job is the top priority for most college graduates.  The value of a degree program is closely tied to its ability to secure good jobs for its candidates -- and the Center for Student Innovation at RIT is betting that open source will play a major role in this process. » Read more

2 Comments

Leveraging cupcakes

What do you get when you combine two hard working women in computing and a 3D printer? Answer after the break...

» Read more

0 Comments

Jaron Lanier: open textbooks "appalling and preposterous"

Jaron Lanier is certainly getting his share of press lately.  His latest guest starring role: a rant in Monday's very special episode of L. Gordon Crozier's technology column for the Wall Street Journal.  Seems like Lanier is becoming a go-to guy when one is in need of a sound bite denouncing "free culture" in all of its radical and dangerous forms.
» Read more

25 Comments