Government

Crowdsourced Icelandic constitution submitted to parliament

Last week, the Iceland Constitutional Council, made up of 25 Icelandic citizens, presented a bill to their parliament outlining a new constitution. The bill contains 114 articles in nine chapters, and includes elements for a more open government. It appears that the population will be given the chance to vote on the new constitution after the Alþingi (national parliament) reviews the draft.

In April 2011, Iceland decided to rewrite their constitution by crowdsourcing ideas and suggestions from the Internet. We've taken a look at the draft constitution and there are several articles that create a more open government for Iceland. » Read more

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Here comes the Neighborland: Creating communities by crowdsourcing

Neighborland is a new ideation crowdsourcing startup that gives citizens a “fun and easy way for residents to suggest new businesses and services that they want in their neighborhood.”

Founded by Candy Chang, Tee Parham and Dan Parham, and funded by the Tulane Social Entrepreneurship program with support from the Rockefeller Foundation, it launched in alpha mode this June in New Orleans.

Co-founder Dan Parham shares his thoughts on the new venture. » Read more

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A case study: Why open data is cool

A case study for municipal open data.

The heat is scorching! Residents across Ontario, Quebec and parts of the US are trying to stay cool. Many seek out public swimming pools and splash-pads, and turn to their municipalities for information. Others, like the Canadian 'hacktivists' Joey Coleman of OpenHamilton and yours truly of OpenHalton seek out ways to make that information more accessible.

Hamilton 's Dowsing and Milton Splash are two of the most recent examples of what is possible with open data. They represent a real-life case study of how open data can help keep us cooler, while also helping cities provide a better service at a lower cost.

This is how: » Read more

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MyTSA app helps returning Jedi (and ordinary humans) fly more efficiently

It is summer, and travel season is upon us.

The annual summer air travel forecast released by the industry trade association for the leading US airlines predicts that those airlines will carry a total of 206.2 million passengers from June through August this year. That is an average of 2.24 million travelers taking to the skies every day this summer. » Read more

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Get Satisfaction: Tips for engaging citizens in gov 2.0

When we talk about open government technology, it’s often in terms of open data, open source software, social media or crowd-sourced ideation and 311 tools. What’s rarely discussed is a truly open, transparent and comprehensive platform where citizens can comment or ask government questions and get direct assistance from public servants or even their own fellow citizens. » Read more

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Open data for humanitarian relief with the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team

It's HOT in Haiti, Indonesia, Ivory Coast, and other nations around the world. Why? Because Kate Chapman, the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT), and many volunteers are improving local economies and creating an open map of the world. » Read more

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Open Knowledge Foundation conference is OK by me

Recently I was in Berlin at OKCon organized by the Open Knowledge Foundation, and I must say it was a great event loaded with presentations and workshops; 10 hours a day, for two straight days, more than 50 sessions on 5 tracks on open data, open education, open economy and much more. Below, I’ve summarized some of the sessions I attended and found worth mentioning. » Read more

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Did you #askobama?

I participated in the first-ever Twitter @townhall meeting hosted by the White House on July 7. Of course, I wanted to see if my questions would make it to the big screen, but I was more interested in the participation and transparency of the event. » Read more

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Iceland's open-door government

After the recent economic crash, many governments had to overhaul both financial structure and fiscal regulation. The majority, including the US government, formed a plan of attack using the same bureaucratic and economic venues in use for centuries. Politicians come to the table with plans and ideas based on their own thinking and research. Some use these opportunities to filter in their own agenda, hidden in layers of jargon and political colloquial, to be reviewed and passed (or passed on) by a body of politicians behind closed doors. » Read more

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Was Independence Day built the open source way?

I've been toying with the idea of the how the open source way fits into the certain historical moments. With the United States celebrating Independence Day (Fourth of July), I started wondering if open source had any influence in the drafting of the Declaration of Independence. So I'll ask you... » Read more

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