Health

Birth control: An open design concept

A new presciption for open source health care

The future of women’s health—and the health of all U.S. citizens, for that matter—has been in the spotlight lately. Health care regulation is an important issue to both President Obama and health care organizations like Planned Parenthood—both of whom argue that it’s critical to pass laws ensuring access to affordable contraception for all women, couples, and families. » Read more

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Join the M revolution – M and R programming languages

MUMPS, M and R programming languages

“'I feel and think much as you do, care about many of the things you care about, although most people do not care about them. You are not alone.” Kurt Vonnegut

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Open source electronic health records for all – at OSCON 2012

OSHERA

A great deal of excitement is in the air, anticipating OSCON 2012.

At the healthcare track, this year we will be sharing the latest news and upcoming plans for OSEHRA, the Open Source Electronic Health Records Agent.

This young organization was set up last year by the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) as: » Read more

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ACOs and Moneyball medicine part IV: Risk-reduction architectures

ACOs and Moneyball medicine part IV: Risk-reduction architectures

We need to "measure what matters" as the saying goes. As we move to new payment models, we'll need to develop platforms that are designed to measure and learn from a wide array of data points about what works in keeping people healthy. Of course, we'll need health care architectures that can support big data across a wide variety of platforms to enable better algorithms and more learning. There's certainly big opportunity for connecting all these systems.

But it's not just the connection of data in and of itself that will lead to improvements in the triple aim of care, health and costs...Health IT architecture itself can improve the likelihood of cost savingsWe need to look deeper at the IT platform as a risk-reducer that can significantly reduce health care costs. Could we one day have an actuarial field of study in the network science in health care?

What do I mean by this? How do architectures reduce risk? Well, mostly by connecting problems with solutions, but in other ways as well. Let's explore this a bit. » Read more

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Public policy: The big opportunity for health record data

Public policy: The big opportunity for health record data

A few weeks ago Colin Hansen - a politician in the governing party in British Columbia (BC) - penned an op-ed in the Vancouver Sun entitled Unlocking our data to save lives. It's a paper both the current government and opposition should read, as it is filled with some very promising ideas.

In it, he notes that BC has one of the best collections of health data anywhere in the world and that, data mining these records could yield patterns - like longitudinal adverse affects when drugs are combined or the correlations between diseases - that could save billions as well as improve health care outcomes. » Read more

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The power of the 1 and how open innovation changed global health

How global health was changed with open innovation

[The following is the speech text for the keynote I gave at the SwitchPoint Conference April 20, 2012]

It is sometimes said that computer scientists worry about only three numbers: 0, 1, and N, where N tends to get very large. Sometimes such oversimplifications can lead to astonishing insights, such as the one that I had 25 years ago in June of 1987. » Read more

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SwitchPoint Conference brings innovators together to improve global health

SwitchPoint

At the first annual SwitchPoint Conference, we’ll bring together some of the best minds in innovation from a broad range of fields and ask them to apply their best thinking to the critical challenge of global health. What kinds of people? Inventors, industry greats, tech, open source, and mobile superstars, multi-disciplinary entrepreneurs, academics, crisis responders, innovators, brand makers, communication specialists, community builders, and funders—the people who can combine their skills to make a difference in global health. » Read more

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Part III: Moneyball medicine, narratives, probabilities, and making better medical decisions

Part III: Moneyball medicine, narratives, probabilities, and making better medic

The Ohio Lottery is now 500+ million. $700 million has already been taken in on this drawing, not a bad for the state. Lotteries work and Vegas was built on this simple notion: we believe we can beat the odds, we all believe we are a little special.

Part of our notion of being special, of our ability to beat the odds comes from our notion of our own narrative, our own story of our life in which we take a starring role. If we can imagine it, » Read more

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Next generation open data: Personal data access

Next generation open data: Personal data access

Last Monday I had the pleasure of being in Mexico City for the OECD's (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) High Level Meeting on e-Government. CIO's from a number of countries were present - including Australia, Canada, the UK and Mexico (among others). But what really got me going was a presentation by Chris Vein, the Deputy United States Chief Technology Officer for Government Innovation. » Read more

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ACOs and Moneyball medicine part II: A new era of Network Science in health care

ACOs and Moneyball medicine part II: A new era of Network Science in health care

Dave Chase (@chasedave), CEO of Avado, spoke at the Collaborative Health Consortium's weekly Pilots and Collaborations call last Friday.

Dave led with the quote from Dr. Josh Umbehr: » Read more

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