Life

Has open hardware finally made its big splash?

open hardware

Chris Clark is the IT director at SparkFun Electronics in Boulder, Colorado. He talked with Opensource.com community manager Jason Hibbets, late last year during the All Things Open conference about open hardware.

He answers a lot of awesome questions about open hardware, where it's going and where it's been. Plus, a big one for a lot of hardware makers out there right now: » Read more

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A 3D printed hand brings the crowd to their feet

open hardware devices

Earlier this year, I shared my story about open source designs and my 3D printed prosthetic hand to a room of 4,600+ at Intel’s Annual International Sales Conference in Las Vegas. I joined Jon Schull on stage, the founder of e-NABLE, an online group dedicated to open source 3D printable assistive devices.

The reaction we got from our talk was unexpected—and it was one of the most awkward and exhilarating experiences of my life. » Read more

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The easiest way to turn your app idea into an appliance

Beagle Bone Black

Jason Kridner is the co-founder of BeagleBoard.org, where he has helped create open source development tools such as BeagleBone Black, BeagleBone, BeagleBoard, and BeagleBoard-xM. Kridner is also a software architecture manager for embedded processors at Texas Instruments (TI). » Read more

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Makers are the new industrial revolution

open up book review

Following up on the recent review of the Maker's Manifesto, I ran across the book Makers: The New Industrial Revolution by Chris Anderson. Anderson is a former Editor in Chief of Wired and no stranger to the economic paradoxes of peer-production and open source. He has written about both in previous books The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business Is Selling Less of More and Free: The Future of a Radical Price.

In his most recent book, Anderson examines the historical parallels between the Maker movement and the second Industrial Revolution, » Read more

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Crew assembles three open source vehicles over lunch

osvehicle assembly

When you think about automobile assembly, usually it's giant factories, robotic arms, and showers of sparks from welding machines that come to mind. But Carlo De Micheli describes his first experience at the OSVehicle project, when three of their Tabby prototype cars were put together by hand during the span of a lunch break.

Today OSVehicle is establishing relations with partners, designers, makers, and manufacturers in 70+ countries and on six continents to bring open source development to the automotive industry.

» Read more

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Recording open culture songs

Open source music

My friend Mary, a folk singer, stopped by to visit spontaneously this evening. "What are you up to?" she inquired.

"I'm recording a music video for a new folk song," I explained. "The Firefox Phone was announced last week, so I need to compose a song about it." » Read more

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How you can help encourage open source in the International Game Developers' Association

open source gaming

If you're at all interested in open source and video games, you've no doubt noticed that the two don't meet nearly as often as we'd like. But we saw Steam finally come to Linux last year. We have Ouya. We have more and more great Linux games appearing, and Linux gamers always give the Humble Bundles more support than Windows or Mac users. Thus it's also time to introduce open source and free culture to the International Game Developers Association (IGDA). Towards that goal, I'll be helping launch the Open Source and Free Culture SIG at the Game Developers Conference next week in San Francisco. » Read more

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Google's coding internship summer program reaches 10th year

coding open source projects

What's new for Google's Summer of Code (GSoC) internship program this year? For one, GSoC accepted 190 mentoring organizations, which is more than any other year. The very first GSoC program began in the summer of 2005, so this year also marks another milestone—they're 10th year anniversary. » Read more

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Free online Linux training, GoDaddy switching to OpenStack, and more

open source news and highlights

Open source news for your reading pleasure.

March 3 - 7, 2014

In this week's edition of our open source news roundup, we look at Rochester Institute of Technology's (RIT) new minor in open source software, the Raspberry Pi's new graphics driver, and more.

» Read more

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Three open source markdown editors put to the test

Open source markdown editors

Very much inspired by my interview with Bryan Behrenshausen, I’ve been spending a lot more time working with Markdown. Day-to-day, at work and at home, I usually work with either HTML or word processed documents. I’m fast with HTML and proficient with word processors, and I rarely need to convert one to the other, but I liked the idea of simplifying my process and using Markdown for everything, with pandoc to convert it.

Markdown is simple enough, but there is a learning curve, so while one of the advantages of it is that it doesn’t require any kind of special editor, the reality is that I needed something with a preview so I could make sure my syntax looked OK (which it often did not). As a result, I went through a few Markdown editors, trying to find the one I like best (and because I love a good rabbit hole).

I eventually narrowed my list to three: ReText, UberWriter, and gedit-markdown. » Read more

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