Life

Teach kids about open source on Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day

Teach kids about open source on Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day

Today is the 20th anniversary of Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day in the US--an excellent opportunity to introduce kids to the concepts of open source (even if you don't have any of your own).

If you work at an open source company

Whether it's software or a company that otherwise embodies openness, you have it easy. When the kids come to your office--whether they're yours or your coworkers'--help show them what your company does. Explain how you contribute. Tell them why your company chooses openness over competitors who do not. Explain the value of open source principles. » Read more

2 Comments

See the Steam client running on Linux; likely available by the end of the year

Steam

One of the most popular posts we've ever had on opensource.com was "Steam for Linux confirmed." Unfortunately it was last year's April Fool's Day joke. But check today's date--April Fool's is almost a month ago now, and this time you can actually see pictures.

Phoronix's Michael Larabel has long stood that the Steam client would eventually be released for Linux, while many others considered it somewhere between a persistent rumor and a dream. » Read more

11 Comments

Open source teaches people how to fish

Open source teaches people how to fish

One of the things I love most about the open source communities I’m a part of is that when I ask a question, I just don’t get the answer, I get taught how to find the answer. » Read more

2 Comments

The day my mind became open sourced

The day my mind became open sourced

I can remember so clearly the exact day my mind became open sourced. It was a crisp and sunny November day in 1973. After class in middle school, I called up my best friend, Bruce Jordan, and asked, "Can I come over to play now?" Bruce replied, "Sure." I jumped on my red, one-speed Schwinn bicycle and biked like mad the two miles over to Bruce's house. I arrived happily breathless. » Read more

11 Comments

Forks and spoons, OpenOffice.org and LibreOffice

Forks and spoons, Open Office and Libre Office

When Oracle gained control of OpenOffice, the project forked, and LibreOffice was born. » Read more

11 Comments

PressurePen: An open source, pressure-sensitive stylus

PressurePen

Charles Mangin, a web developer and consultant based in Raleigh, NC, hoped to recreate the drawing-tablet experience (such as that with a Wacom device) on what we today think of as tablets (like iPads and Android tablets)--and to do it as open hardware. The result is now on Kickstarter: the PressurePen. » Read more

0 Comments

Developer conference 2012 part III: Workshops, hackfests, and more

Developer conference 2012: Workshops, hackfests, and more

The 2012 Developer Conference (held at Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic) included talks on numerous topics and had several side events in smaller rooms. Most of them were practical workshops focused on a certain technology or project. Aslak Knutsen had two of them--the first one focused on Arquillian SPI and the second on development of Java EE applications. » Read more

0 Comments

Open source wayfinding with Walk [Your City]

Open source wayfinding with Walk [Your City]

It's a two-second trip to visit walkyourcity.org. But before you head over there, you'll want to hear from Matt Tomasulo, founder of CityFabric and chief instigator of Walk Raleigh and Walk [Your City]. Urban Times called Walk [Your City] "Open Source Guerrilla Wayfinding." It's a simple idea of helping pedestrians overcome the hurdle of distance perception, and by doing so, promoting a healthier lifestyle.

A few weeks ago at Triangle Wiki Day, Tomasulo mentioned he wanted to take his Walk Raleigh idea global, and using the principles of open source were the perfect way to do so. The open source walking adventure is starting. Tomasulo has started a successful Kickstarter campaign and is gathering support for the Walk Your City platform.

See how open source has influenced the Walk [Your City] project in our interview with Matt Tomasulo. » Read more

0 Comments

Bohemian broadband and the FOSS/maker culture

Bohemian broadband and the FOSS/maker culture

Last month, Verizon announced their HomeFusion broadband Internet service, which provides faster-than-DSL Internet service to a broad swath of rural America. After paying a one time fee of $200 for a device that hangs on the side of your house, you can live anywhere Verizon's LTE cell phone service reaches and receive fixed wireless broadband Internet at that location for $60/month.

For the longest time, rural home dwellers have had very poor choices for high-speed Internet. Some chose to use satellite Internet service, but that was often a costly and unsatisfactory solution. Verizon's new option is going to be » Read more

16 Comments

Mozilla Open Badges ships beta release

Mozilla Open Badges ships beta release

Adding skills and achievements to your online identity

When Mozilla’s Open Badges project began in late 2010, it was little more than a demo and an audaciously big idea: what if we could use the web to create whole new ways to "show what you know?

Today, that big idea is becoming reality, with impressive partners and new Mozilla Open Badges beta software coming together to test how digital badges can supercharge learning and identity. » Read more

0 Comments