Life

Can we use collaboration to solve government's big problems?

Aneesh Chopra, the White House's chief technology officer, was at HIMMS last week talking about government as a platform for innovation. He referenced the open and transparent process that led to the Direct Project, which saw dozens of vendors, some of them competitors, working together with the ONC to establish a secure way to send health information as a possible template for bringing together stakeholders to create innovation. » Read more

2 Comments

Neighbors helping NeighborGoods

First of all, I want to thank Jason for giving me the opportunity to post here. I'm a big fan of OpenSource.com and the community that's brewing here. Hopefully this won't be the last time you hear from me.

I'm writing today to ask for your help. We began a Kickstarter fundraising campaign for NeighborGoods this morning. We've already raised over 10% of our goal which is really amazing! With your help, we'll have no trouble raising the full amount.

Since we launched 6 months ago, » Read more

0 Comments

Dru Lavigne: Confessions of a community manager

Dru Lavigne has been contributing to BSD since late 90s and is now the community manager for PC-BSD. At SCALE9x, which continues in LA through this weekend, she spoke about being a community manager and how to decide whether your project is ready to have one.

What is a community manager? » Read more

0 Comments

Bringing information sharing to healthcare

Sharing health information like diagnoses, lab tests, or prescriptions easily and securely has been a huge challenge for doctors, hospitals, and patients. In fact, many in the healthcare industry still exchange information by mail or fax.

The Direct Project works to bring healthcare into the computer age, improving patient care and curbing costs by helping people share information more effectively. » Read more

2 Comments

Poll: The world's first open source city

Poll: The world's first open source city

I posted an article earlier this week claiming Raleigh, NC is primed to be an open source hub. In the comments, Evan Prodromou shared a similar and coincidentally timed blog post: Montreal the Open Source startup hub. » Read more

3 Comments

Open source, a healthy choice

"In 2004, six months after suddenly losing my father, I became a single dad. I was forced to give up my travelling position as an application specialist for a large ERP software manufacturer."  

Aaron Nursoo first became interested in open source software because it was free.  He saw in it an opportunity to teach himself skills that would help him to restructure his life and allow him to support his family. » Read more

0 Comments

Tips for an open source process

Governance is the word for open source in 2011. Governance breaks down to two topics, structures and process.

The same elements that make for a stable democratic system also make for good open source governance. This doesn't mean you need a balance of powers, or a judicial branch. It means you need the rules of governance clearly stated, and a process that will allow the best ideas to get prompt action from those running the project. » Read more

0 Comments

Raleigh, NC—the world's first open source city

I started pondering what qualities would define an open source city a few months ago when my friend Tom Rabon mentioned it to me one day. I was curious how the city I live in, Raleigh, NC, could attract other open source companies and be the world's hub for open source and a leader in open government. How could Raleigh be the open source capital of the world, similar to what Silicon Valley is to technology and Paris is to romance?

I think the answer can be found in both the government and the people. » Read more

15 Comments

Open source is for lovers

It's true. If you think about the characteristics of open source and the qualities of a successful relationship, you will find a lot of overlap.

OPEN: You have to be open and flexible to make a relationship work. Going back to my favorite analogy in regards to open source software and proprietary software--proprietary software is like buying a car with the hood welded shut. Oh, you need to change to oil? Too bad. Buy a new car. If we aren't flexible and open to change--if our hoods are welded shut--it makes it extremely difficult to keep the (love) engine running.
» Read more

7 Comments

A MeeGo timeline: What led up to today's Microsoft/Nokia partnership?

Today the landscape changed for open source and smartphones when Microsoft and Nokia announced a partnership making Windows Phone 7 the platform for Nokia smartphones. For those who don't follow the mobile device industry (and perhaps just learned the word "MeeGo" this morning), or for those who are just trying to keep track, here's a timeline of what happened leading up to today's announcement:

Nov. 2005: First version of Maemo platform, based on Debian, released by Nokia for smartphones and tablets » Read more

7 Comments