Life

Anti-openness gifts: An open advocate's confessions

For my birthday several months ago, I got a Kindle. No fewer than three people have since asked me, "What are you doing with a Kindle? It's not very open source-y."

Confession: I love my Kindle. I only have one book to carry when I travel. I can play games. And it let me tweet from Paris over free 3G from Open World Forum, where cell data was expensive and, like many conferences, the wifi was shaky. Surely that counts for something?

But the accusers are right. It's not very "open source-y." The DRM is painful and prevents sharing. » Read more

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Mashing up library data with open source

When I was approached nearly five years ago now and asked to put together an edited work on how libraries can use mashups to improve services, I have to admit that I was a bit disappointed that the topic wasn't going to be open source software instead. Before the ink had even dried on my mashups book though I was offered the opportunity I wanted, a book on open source software for libraries. Now when I'm asked to speak at conferences and events the topic of interest is either open source or mashups, but never both. While there are of course differences in these two types of technologies, there are also similarities. » Read more

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Open*Life: 2010 in review

What a great year on the Open*Life channel here at opensource.com. We had more than 150 posts covering how open source touches our lives. This is our year in review--a time to reflect on what happened over the last year and a chance to look forward to next year.

I'd first like to thank all the authors and readers who contributed articles, thoughts, comments, reviews, artwork, feedback, and all the work that goes on behind the scenes to post an article on the site. It's truly a community effort. We are always looking for new authors, ideas for content, and improvement.

In 2011, we are looking to cover more topics on open source in our lives. We look forward to hearing more of your ideas. Let's take a look back at 2010 and see our top 10 posts, a few of my favorites, and my editor picks. » Read more

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Poll: Open*Life 2010 best images

catalyst system

The visual components on opensource.com are an important element to the look and feel of our content. The images help set the tone for the site. The imagery embodies several qualities such as motivational, editorial, authoritative (but not authoritarian), human, and optimism.

Without our imagery, the content on the site would be plain and unsightly. We'd like to highlight some of the images from 2010 and give you a chance to pick your favorite. » Read more

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The potential for Project REALISE

We got a chance to catch up with some of the folks behind Project REALISE. REALISE is an acronym that stands for Refining and learning from online tools for Internet shared enterprise. The project focuses on accessibility and ease-of-use in the field of assistive technology, and has made breakthroughs in the education, employment, and health sectors. The key, they say, is finding the right partnerships.

Lately, they've been adding to their idea lab and incubator, while growing their community and getting ready for others to participate. Dr. Mike Wald, Senior Lecturer at the University of Southampton, is part of the core project team. He is a principal investigator and conducts research into accessible technologies for the project.

Dr. Wald was happy to help us understand how Project REALISE is primed to make the world more accessible. » Read more

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FCC launches Open Internet Apps Challenge

In the fallout of the controversial net neutrality order approved by the FCC today, they extend what at least on the surface appears to be an olive branch towards openness: the Open Internet Apps Challenge on challenge.gov.

The challenge was launched with today's order approval and saying this about openness: » Read more

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An open plea to video content providers

Netflix, Hulu, Blockbuster VOD, Vudu, and a slew of other video streaming services have been popping up left and right. Yet there's a big problem with most of these services: many of them suffer from the same mentality that the recording industry had in 1999--they are resisting the demands of their customers. » Read more

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Last minute open giving ideas

Whether or not you're among the throngs hurriedly trying to get everything wrapped before the end of the week, it's a good time to consider some end-of-the-year giving. So why not send some money towards open projects? » Read more

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Netflix completes the open source giving cycle

Netflix gets it. They understand the power of open source.

Kevin McEntee, VP of Systems & ECommerce Engineering at Netflix wrote a blog post about how Netflix does more than just consume open source. McEntee highlights three key components of the open source way that typically equate to success. He doesn't refer to them this clearly, but the three components he's really talking about are: » Read more

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What is hint.io? Gawker's compromised data and the ethics of transparency

Did you recently find that a stunning number of your Twitter friends spent their weekends discovering the miracles of acai berry? In short, Gawker Media account information was compromised this weekend, and the first place the information was put to use was a mass attack of Twitter spam. » Read more

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