Should people have the right to examine the source code of medical devices implanted in their bodies? | Opensource.com

Should people have the right to examine the source code of medical devices implanted in their bodies?

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87 votes tallied
Sure. The FDA needs to join the 21st century.
52 votes
Only the patient has that right, and they should agree to sign non-disclosure agreements.
1 vote
No, it's an academic issue. No typical patient would be able to understand or improve the source code running in their devices.
5 votes
No. Device makers need to protect their investment in R&D. If their products are faulty, the market will punish them.
4 votes
No. It could create opportunities for malicious hacking, and the risks of that kind of openness outweigh the benefits.
2 votes
I like the idea, but doubt the FDA has the expertise to evaluate source code for medical devices.
23 votes

Karen Sandler, Executive Director of the Gnome Foundation, recently gave a talk at OSCON 2011 explaining why free software is critical on implantable medical devices. (Sandler has a defibrillator.) She's wants the FDA to collect and examine the source code used in such devices, and make the code publicly available.

Should people have the right to examine the source code of medical devices implanted in their bodies?

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About the author

Colin Dodd - Colin Dodd is a writer at Red Hat.