Help us write the sixth Open Organization book

Creating a handbook for achieving openness at scale

We're launching a community book project aimed at collecting the best case studies and exercises that illustrate openness in action.

Writing a handbook for achieving openness at scale
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"Yeah, but how do you actually do that?"

It's the most common question our community fields, both on Opensource.com and at innumerable conferences and workshops. People tend to understand why practicing openness in the workplace leads to greater agility, better innovation, and increased engagment—they just need to know how to achieve it all.

So we're writing a book to explain. And you can help.

We've nicknamed it The Open Organization Workbook, a working title that gestures to the new volume's utility as a handbook for achieving openness at scale, no matter the organizational size or mission. This sixth installment in the Open Organization book series will collect practical, actionable wisdom from change agents all over the world—people dedicated to helping individuals, teams, and entire organizations effectively harness the power of open thinking. It'll be our most ambitous book yet.

It'll also be one of our most important. As Jim Whitehurst observed more than a year ago, understanding the "how" of the open organization—"the concrete and specific activities that occur when leaders-as-catalysts and associates-as-engaged-participants meet"—continues to be our community's most presing challenge. For Jim, that's what "continues to prove most mysterious and elusive to organizations today":

How specifically can we develop tactics to harness and direct passion and performance? How can we systematize our most successful structures? And how do we share our best practices and our failures?

How?

We'll answer that question the open source way: By launching a community book project aimed at collecting the best case studies and exercises that illustrate openness in action.

Want to help? Just read the instructions on GitHub, look over the table of contents, and submit a pitch by August 25.

About the author

Bryan Behrenshausen
Bryan Behrenshausen - Bryan has been a writer and editor at Opensource.com team since 2011. In 2015, he earned his PhD in Communication from UNC, Chapel Hill. When he's not thinking or writing about all things open source, he's playing vintage Nintendo, reading classic science fiction, or rehabilitating an old ThinkPad. Around the Net, he goes by the nickname "semioticrobotic."