code for america - Page number 3

Code for America recruiting startups for Civic Startup Accelerator

Code for America's recruiting startups for Civic Startup Accelerator

Soon after we launched the Code for America (CfA) fellowship, we realized that to accomplish the kind of change we were seeking not only would government have to change but also the civic tech ecosystem. There needed to be more innovation, more dynamism, more entrepreneurship. City Hall needs disruption from the outside as well. So taking from the precedent set in other industries (the consumer web, healthcare, clean tech, social, etc) — we decided to build a startup accelerator, focused on disrupting civic space.

0 Comments

The Code for America brigade effect

The Code for America 'brigade effect'

Have you ever seen results from your community engagement and realized the impact of your efforts? We recently told you about the LocalWiki project and shared some of the results from the Triangle Wiki day event. But then our friends at Code for America took it a step further. » Read more

4 Comments

LocalWiki project spawns open source communities

LocalWiki project spawns open source communities

Who says open source is all about code and hackathons have to stick to computer hacking? Code Across America is a different kind of open source community, and it came together on February 25, 2012. This effort was part of civic innovation week (February 24-March 4), where over a dozen cities in the United States have citizens organizing to improve their cities and communities. Simultaneous events included hackathons, unconferences, meet-ups, and Code for America ’brigades’ deploying existing open source applications. This is a story about building community knowledge the open source way, using the open source platform LocalWiki. » Read more

0 Comments

2012: Open innovation for government

2012: Open innovation for government

As we turn the calendar to the new year, we'd like to take a moment to reflect on what we've done here at Civic Commons over the past year, what we've learned, and where we're planning on heading next.

It's been a busy year for us. While the Civic Commons initiative began, slowly, as an informal partnership between Code for America and OpenPlans in early 2010, we really began working in earnest last May, thanks to generous startup support from the Omidyar Network, the MacArthur Foundation, and the Knight Foundation.

Since then, we've accelerated our work towards our broad goal: » Read more

0 Comments

Calling all open government communities: Where do you start?

Calling all open government communities: Where do you start?

How does someone new to the open government movement know where to start? Where can they can get involved and align their interests and passions with a community already hard at work?

There are myriad open government communities, ranging from Code for America to The Sunlight Foundation, GovLoop to CityCamp, and everything in between. Where is the list of organizations that are working specifically on government transparency, collaboration, participation, and open data? Until recently, I'm not sure one existed. » Read more

2 Comments

NYT features Chicago’s "Adopt-a-Sidewalk"

NYT features Chicago’s "Adopt-a-Sidewalk"

As the Windy City prepares for another major snow season, Chicago’s CTO John Tolva and team have been hard at work, turning out a robust suite of online tools to help citizens track and even support the city’s management efforts: ChicagoShovels.org. The New York Times recently featured their innovative efforts — which ranged from real-time snow plow tracking to 311-powered crowdsourcing:

1 Comment

Code for America opens 2013 application period

Code for America opens 2013 application period

Does your city need to solve a big civic problem? Cities across the United States can now submit their Code for America applications for 2013. Boston, Philadelphia, and Seattle have just wrapped up their 2011 projects. We're eager to see what happens in Austin, Detroit, Chicago, Honolulu, Macon, New Orleans, Philadelphia, and Santa Cruz in 2012. The application process opened on January 9, and applicants have until the end of March to complete their submissions.

What problems can your city tackle with help from Code for America? How can your city build on other open source projects to make your government more accessible, more efficient, and more engaged with citizens? » Read more

0 Comments

Code for America: CityCamp is seriously local

Code for America: CityCamp is seriously local

Saturday December 3, CityCamp Honolulu packed the student center at the University of Hawaii. The one-day event brought together nearly 150 locals to discuss and plan for updating the interface for Honolulu’s city services. Forest Frizzell, director of the City’s department of information technology and Burt Lum, a local activist and the man behind ByteMarks Cafe, a Hawaii Public radio show, are responsible for hosting this important event. Burt emceed the event, and moderated the two panels that discussed everything from current city initiatives and records requests to the forthcoming 2012 Code for America fellowship program. » Read more

0 Comments

What action or organization did the most to advance open government in the U.S. in 2011?

What action or organization did the most to advance open government in the U.S.

What a year for open government. Lots of data was opened, governments worldwide started to collaborate and become more transparent, platforms were created, partnerships were formed, and Code for America wrapped up a successful year. That's just the tip of iceberg.

I'd like to ask you: What do you think advanced open government the most in 2011? » Read more

0 Comments

Change By Us citizen engagement platform now open source

Change By Us citizen engagement platform now open source

As cities are facing growing demands and shrinking resources, they have to find new ways of solving problems. Change by Us, a new digital platform that enables citizens to collaborate on projects for city improvement themselves, is a promising model of a new kind of civic engagement. Launched in New York City earlier this year, the application is now being used in Philadelphia as well and is freely available for reuse through a open source license.

0 Comments