Working in an open organization means actively addressing everything that prevents collaboration. It means, as Sam Knuth says, "putting the moose on the table."
6 comments Posted 23 Sep 2015 by Sam Knuth (Red Hat) Feed
Jim Whitehurst explains his decision to distribute the book via traditional publisher Harvard Business Review (HBR) Press. He says that in many ways, HBR does for books what Red Hat does for open source software—it collaborates with creators and adds value to the products of these collaborations.
2 comments Posted 25 Aug 2015 by Jim Whitehurst (Red Hat) Feed
Working in an open organization is truly a team effort, and that means doing a bit of everything—even changing lightbulbs. Pete Savage explains how being part of an open organization means embracing a certain ethos.
0 comments Posted 18 Aug 2015 by Pete Savage (Red Hat) Feed
This summer, Barbara Ann Spangler, marketing operations intern at Red Hat, learned how to harness the power of community.
0 comments Posted 11 Aug 2015 by Barbara Ann Spangler Feed
Red Hat intern Meggie Milbauer discovers that life in an open organization isn't anything like the movies.
1 comment Posted 4 Aug 2015 by Meggie Milbauer (Red Hat) Feed
Carla Rudder reflects on how principles of the open organization helped her feel welcome and empowered in her new role at Red Hat.
0 comments Posted 16 Jul 2015 by Carla Rudder (Red Hat) Feed
Red Hatter shares her experience working at Red Hat and talks about why she was quoted in the CEO's new book, The Open Organization.
0 comments Posted 9 Jul 2015 by Rebecca Fernandez (Red Hat) Feed
Leaders in the new world of networks and virtual communities face a similar identity choice. With more leaders taking advantage of informally connected talent, the "wisdom of crowds," and open source innovation, how much should they try to "go native?" Should they operate as members of the networks... Read more
0 comments Posted 7 Jul 2015 by Brook Manville Feed
In June this year, a few open source projects expanded and several useful resources were published, along with many other developments in the digital humanities. Joshua Allen Holm highlights the most interesting of them in this article.
0 comments Posted 6 Jul 2015 by Joshua Allen Holm Feed
Building an open organization can we worth the effort and the pain. You'll have an organization that can quickly adapt, that has a better chance of retaining talented people, and which can engage those within the organization and without.
0 comments Posted 25 Jun 2015 by Scott Nesbitt Feed