communities - Page number 2

Webcast replay: Lessons learned for building open source communities

Webcast replay: Lessons learned for building open source communities

Chris Grams, partner and president of New Kind and author of The Ad-Free Brand, moderated our November 2011 Open Your World Forum webcast with Dries Buytaert and Michael Tiemann. You can read more about our speakers and how Linux and Drupal have evolved as two thriving open source communities in our webcast recap.

Here is an outline to the recording: » Read more

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WEBCAST: Register now for "Drupal and Linux: Lessons learned for building open source communities"

WEBCAST: Register now for "Drupal and Linux: Lessons learned for building open s

Join us for an Open Your World Forum webcast to explore how Linux and Drupal have evolved as two thriving open source communities competing in the enterprise world. Our guests, Michael Tiemann, Vice President of Open Source Affairs at Red Hat, and Dries Buytaert, creator of Drupal and co-founder and Chief Technology Officer of Acquia will share their personal stories and perspectives on how they lead their respective communities through the social and cultural turning points and the lessons they learned along the way. Chris Grams, partner and president of New Kind and author of The Ad-Free Brand will moderate. » Read more

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In a tough job market, your open source experience may be an asset in more ways than one

open source work experience

Does this describe you?

You've been using open source software or contributing to open source projects for a long time. Perhaps you are in a job where you utilize open source tools regularly, or maybe you are just fooling around with them for fun or to learn new skills.

You've been known to tell (possibly true) stories that highlight how long you've been a part of the open source world (from "I remember downloading the first version of Fedora" to "I was in the room when the term open source was coined"). But, most importantly, you consider yourself an active member of one or more open source communities. » Read more

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Open gov communities, hackathons, and Google Plus

I've found myself hanging out more and more on GovLoop lately. It's a social network for the government community focused on connecting people and sharing information. It boasts more than 45,000 members, and I'm happy to be a part of the community. I first learned about GovLoop at a CityCamp event earlier this year. Now that I've become more active in the community, I wanted to share a few topics from GovLoop that you might find interesting. » Read more

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The responsibility in open source

I’ve written before about the genuine renaissance open source software represents and the vast implications that openness provides. I’ve admitted that computer science, based on its relative unwillingness to share great ideas, has lagged behind other hard sciences in its understanding of how and where value is created. » Read more

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Education in 2030: Open source and community-based

I'd like to talk about what education is going to look like 20 years from now. I think, in 2030, our schools will mimic open source communities. » Read more

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Balancing transparency and privacy

One of the keys to a successful open source community is appropriate transparency. A community with strong values around transparency will also be likely to respect its participants privacy. Such a community will also be unlikely to have a copyright assignment benefiting a commercial party. Here's why.

An open source community arises from the synchronization of the individual interest of many parties. Each person: » Read more

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How does open source affect company culture?

An open source company is naturally a company that produces open source code for others to consume. But how does the notion of producing software code in the open affect company culture? » Read more

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The four capital mistakes of open source

How do you develop a successful open source business that lasts? Of the more than 250,000 open source projects on SourceForge, few will be successful at that goal. But one way they might think about how to do it is by doing it in reverse: What should an open source project or business not do?

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