contributor

With greater permissions, comes greater responsibility

open source coding

I came to work with open source after an experience in college. We used a system called Usenet,a world wide distributed discussion forum. At the university, there wasn't an email client I liked, so I wrote one and just gave it (including the source code) to whoever wanted it. This experience introduced me to a community of people who made things and shared them; it also introduced me to a job at my alma mater as a Usenet administrator. » Read more

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When people freely share, it makes things better for everyone

open source projects

Joshua Holm is the kind of guy you want to have on your chat list if you’re ever looking for an open source tool to tackle a task. That’s because he actively keeps up with the latest open source tools and projects because much of his work involves helping people find the right software tool to meet their needs. So if you’re looking for an open source version of something, chances are Joshua can make a recommendation.

At opensource.com, Joshua is a frequent commenter, regularly doling out insights based on his open source and real world experiences. He also recently wrote a post highlighting Ren’Py, the open source tool for developing visual novels.

Beyond evangelizing for open source tools and resources, Joshua also enjoys academic research and providing technical assistance to job seekers. Learn more about how Joshua uses open source tools in his life in this Community Spotlight interview.

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10 ways to start contributing to open source

redwoods

I wonder why more open source users do not actively participate in the open source community and become committers or contributors.

After understanding a project's capabilities and roadmap, anyone is able to start directly hacking the source code and contributing useful extensions. Because open source is a distributed, participatory meritocracy, the upside benefit is high and the barrier to entry is low—you don't have to move, be employed by a Valley startup, give up your day job, or wait to obtain a 4 years for a degree. » Read more

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Community spotlight: 5 questions with John Scott, founder of MIL-OSS and Open Source for America

Community spotlight: 5 questions with John Scott, military software development

Meet John Scott. He is a systems engineer in Alexandria, Virginia. Scott has worked extensively on open source software policy for the US government and military--and helped found MIL-OSS and Open Source for America.

On opensource.com, community is very important. We want to continue to recognize our community members who contribute in ways other than writing articles--things like rating and commenting, voting in polls, and sharing our collective work on social media. We hope you enjoy getting to know John. » Read more

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The importance of Wikipedia

The importance of Wikipedia

Mirror mirror on the wall, what's the most important open source project of them all? » Read more

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Community spotlight: Scott Nesbitt, contributor to FLOSS manuals

Community spotlight: Scott Nesbitt, contributor to FLOSS manuals

Meet Scott Nesbitt. He's a freelance writer and consultant in Toronto, Canada. He uses open source tools for more than 85 percent of the work he does. He's idealistic about more getting more open data from our governments. Nesbitt also contributes to FLOSS Manuals (FLOSS stands for Free/Libre open source software) by helping to document open source projects. Documentation for the win!

On opensource.com, community is very important. We want to continue to recognize our community members who contribute in ways other than writing articles--things like rating and commenting, voting in polls, and sharing our collective work on social media. We hope you enjoy getting to know Scott. » Read more

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Community spotlight: Paul Booker, Mozilla contributor

Community spotlight: Paul Booker, Mozilla contributor

On opensource.com, community is very important. We want to continue to recognize our community members who contribute in ways other than writing articles--things like rating and commenting, voting in polls, and sharing our collective work on social media. This is the second of our community spotlight posts.

Meet Paul Booker. He's a web developer in Birmingham, England and a contributor to Mozilla. He is a big fan of Drupal and helps edit the about:mozilla newsletter. We hope you enjoy getting to know Paul. » Read more

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Community spotlight: Peter Borsa, fan of Drupal and Fedora

Community spotlight: Peter Borsa fan of Drupal and Fedora

On opensource.com, our community is very important. This is why we started the contributor spotlight earlier this year. But we wanted to also recognize community members who contribute in ways other than writing articles--things like rating and commenting, voting in polls, and sharing our collective work on social media. So this is the first of our community spotlight posts.

Meet Peter Borsa. He's a student at the University of Debrecen in Hungary. He is passionate about Drupal and Fedora. We hope you enjoy getting to know Peter and finding out what he thinks the biggest challenges to openness are and why he chooses the open source way. » Read more

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Community-building and diversity take-aways from PyCon 2011

Here at PyCon2011, there are quite a few open source rock stars in attendance. Software hackers of various stripes, developers from the corporate and community realms, and many other technically savvy and interested folks. » Read more

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How to become an amazing contributor (to an open source project)

It's a busy morning here in New York City. My email inbox is full of pleasant surprises. The first is a patch for one of my open source projects. A second will appear this afternoon. A third should come late at night—or maybe tomorrow–from a new contributor.

Alongside my day job, I contribute and manage open source projects. The number of projects I work on has grown from a couple of small tools to well over a dozen in the last three years. Open source has become a great way to learn new technology, experiment with modern software development practices, and, of course, meet other like-minded engineers. I find that seeing great contributors send working and tested code provides a unique feeling of accomplishment, as powerful as having many satisfied users of my own applications or strong revenues posted by the employer that pays my bills. » Read more

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