failure

Twitter co-founder Biz Stone on success, failure, and the future of social

Biz Stone, Twitter co-founder

Twitter (as well as Xanga, Odeo, and Blogger) co-founder Biz Stone keynoted this week’s 2012 Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference with the history of Twitter alongside advice on the future of the social web and what it means to be successful.

"The story of Twitter... this is a weird story," he began. Stone left Google “at a time when it was silly to leave,” as he put it, and with Evan Williams started Odeo, which used RSS to aggregate and publish podcasts. Then Apple created iTunes, and the Odeo founders started looking for the next project. » Read more

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Life is in alpha--Killing the myth of the open source failure

In writing my first article about open source games, it became apparent that I had plenty of ground to cover, and not just specific to games. It's a known trend in open source: The majority of started projects never finish. If you think this is a problem that needs solving, I will argue that you are mistaken. This time around I want to address the topic of ‘making the journey worth your while.' You can take your pick of popular proverbs, but this is such common wisdom that it even comes in the flavor of rich media:

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Joan Siefert Rose on the insanity of entrepreneurship

Joan Siefert Rose is the president of CED, a 25-year-old organization with 5,500 active members who promote and work to accelerate the entrepreneurial culture in North Carolina and the Research Triangle area in particular. She gave a talk at today's TEDx Raleigh event outlining the six symptoms of what she called the "Insanity of Entrepreneurship." » Read more

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Fear of failure? Embrace it by failing fast.

This is the third in a series exploring the things I have learned from the open source way during my journey with Red Hat.

One of the key tenets of the open source way is “release early, release often.” This means rather than keeping an idea or project "secret" until it is perfect, you go ahead and share it or make it available to others. You get it out there, let people play around with it, test it, expose its weaknesses, you allow peer review. » Read more

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How to tell if your open source project will fail

The new community get-it-done handbook, "The Open Source Way," doesn't seek to be controversial, but with information that's distilled, brief, and to the point, contention is unavoidable. Especially where the book takes a hardline stance on how to act and not act; a stance that is derived from the years of experience of the contributors involved. » Read more

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