free culture

The Liberated Pixel Cup: proving the potential for free culture and free software game development

Liberated Pixel Cup

What do you get when you mix the Free Software Foundation, Creative Commons, and OpenGameArt? We'll know the answer for sure come August, because these three organizations have joined forces to create the Liberated Pixel Cup. A contest where artists and developers will come together, to create free-as-in-freedom games and art.

Christopher Allan Webber from Creative Commons explains that he approached both Bart Kelsey of OpenGameArt and John Sullivan of the Free Software Foundations to see if they were interested in a collaboration.
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Transforming the grid from analog to digital

On Monday I was invited to participate in the Energy panel of the President's Council of Jobs and Competitiveness.  After introductions by NCSU Chancellor Randy Woodson, North Carolina Senator Kay Hagan, and US Department of Commerce Secretary Gary Locke, Chair of the Council (and Chairman and CEO of GE) Jeffrey Immelt got right to the point of the session: He and his team came to North Carolina to listen.  His job, and the job of the council, is to integrate ideas and insights from business leaders around the country into a realistic plan that can meaningfully reduce unemployment, strengthen our economy, and do so in a sustainable way.  Energy technologies, policies, and strategies are all important dimensions to this overall challenge, and the assembled leaders--who are users, distributors, and generators of energy--came ready to participate in the discussion. » Read more

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Does the market need freedom, or is it modern sharecropping?

During breakout sessions at Berlin's Free Culture Research Conference, Giorgos Cheliotis from the National University of Singapore led a discussion stemming from a recent conversation with Lawrence Lessig. The intention was a thought experiment comparing “free”--freedom and free culture—in the market with sharecropping.

Mike Linksvayer, vice-president of Creative Commons, addressed this broad conversation's main challenge on Twitter: » Read more

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Larry Lessig takes on Washington

I had the opportunity to sit down with Larry Lessig last week.  Co-founder of Creative Commons, law professor, author, and copyright guru, Lessig is a visionary of law and technology policy.

In the FLOSS community, Lessig is best known for his book Free Culture and work on copyright policy. In his view, attitudes towards copyright started to change when we saw kids and grandmothers sued for file sharing. Lessig has never argued for abolishment of copyright, but he has always argued that there needs to be balancea more permissive society that allows artists to reserve the rights they need, while allowing others to remix and improve without fear of prosecution.

But two years ago, Lessig moved away from the copyright field to invest more time researching institutional corruption and citizen-funded elections. » Read more

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Is Jaron Lanier just a hater, or should we be paying attention?

Last week, my friend Greg DeKoenigsberg posted an article about Jaron Lanier's negative comments regarding open textbooks. At almost very same time, I happened to stumble upon an article Jaron wrote back in 2006 criticizing Wikipedia. » Read more

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What does information really want?

Cory Doctorow says "information wants to be free" slogan is "lazy, stupid shorthand."

(See discussions at Shareable.net and Utne Reader)

When celebrated science fiction writer, blogger, and copyright activist Cory Doctorow tweets, 40,000 followers glance at their phones. » Read more

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