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Comparing Apples to Androids: Why the future of smartphones looks open

In the few weeks I have owned a smartphone (a Kyocera Zio with Android), I've been fascinated to see how many non-technical users are experiencing the power of open source for the first time.

Between the proliferation of free and inexpensive apps in the Android Market and the numerous mobile companies offering their own Android phones, it's hard to believe it all started with a single G1 phone.

(Yes, I remember the Trolltech Greenphone and other predecessors, but nevertheless, a tip of the hat to Google for getting Android onto 19%—perhaps 20% before I finish typing this parenthetical disclaimer—of all smartphones.) » Read more

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Apple, Google, and the open vs. closed positioning war

Over the last few months, the battle to define the meaning of the word "open" has intensified into one of the more interesting brand positioning exercises I've seen in the technology industry (if you aren't familiar with brand positioning and would like to learn more, consider starting here).

I thought I'd do a quick report from the front lines, diving in specifically to examine the battle for smartphone leadership, and looking at things from a brand positioning strategy perspective. » Read more

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Wipeout! Google Wave's inevitable crash

Well, it seems that Google Wave isn't quite dead yet after all. Turns out, they're open sourcing a bit more of the project and asking for collaboration. (Ok, someone to take over.)

I can't be the only geek who immediately thought of Monty Python and the Holy Grail upon reading the announcement. » Read more

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The open source organization: good in theory or good in reality?

On occasion I get the opportunity to speak publicly about some of the things I've learned over the years applying the open source way in organizations. » Read more

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An open letter to my longtime friend Google

Dear Google,

We've been together a long time. Had a lot of good times together. There are so many things about you I love. Gmail, great idea. Docs, very useful for sharing. I call GOOG-411 all the time. Heck, I even tried out Knol. (That was just me, wasn't it?) But I'm starting to think you might be losing sight of your best feature--that whole "don't be evil" thing. » Read more

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Google and the culture of participation

Co-author: Bascha Harris

With the WWW2010 conference in Raleigh the first week of May, a slew of open source rock stars were in our hometown. Chris DiBona, Public Sector Engineering Manager at Google, was able to visit the Red Hat office and talk with us during his trip. The focus of his talk was the enormous culture of participation that companies like Google and Red Hat—and technologies like the Internet—attempt to embrace and extend, despite naysayers and proprietary business habits. » Read more

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Jeremy Allison and Terri Molini on Open Source for America and change in Washington

Jeremy Allison of Google and Terri Molini of Initmarketing, both presenting on behalf of Open Source for America (OSFA), joined us for the first Open Your World Forum.  OSFA is organized to advocate for open source technology use in the US Federal government, and represents  well over a thousand members, including tech industry leaders, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and academic research institutions. » Read more

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Five open source alternatives to the iPad

Interest in iPad app development is waning, and the device just got here. Maybe that means it's time to explore more open options. Here are five. » Read more

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The Wikimedia Foundation: doing strategic planning the open source way

Earlier this week I wrote a post about some of the cultural challenges Wikipedia is facing as its contribution rate has slowed. The comments you made were fantastic, including one by Dr. Ed H Chi (the PARC scientist who published the study I referred to in the post) linking to a prototype dashboard his team created to showcase who is editing each Wikipedia page (totally fascinating—you have to go try it!) » Read more

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