James Boyle

Theft! A History of Music —Part 3: If I could turn forward time...

Imagine a 20-year-old musician publishing his work today. Let's pretend he's living the fast and reckless life of a rock star and will die young at 45. Because the copyright term has been ratcheted up to life of the author plus 70 years (or 95 years from publication for corporate works), you won't be able to sample his work without permission (for your heartfelt tribute song, of course), until 2105. But since you're not living his rock star lifestyle, maybe you can hang on another 95 years to grab your chance. » Read more

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Theft! A History of Music—Part 2: Copyright jams

Our society and its lawmakers are notoriously bad at predicting the effects of new technologies. I think of the ongoing battles over new distribution formats, like the assumption that "the VCR [would be] to the American film producer and the American public as the Boston strangler is to the woman home alone." Jennifer Jenkins, one of the authors of Theft! A History of Music, has an even more basic and older example: musical notation. » Read more

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Theft! A History of Music—Part 1: Plato and all that jazz

Why did Plato argue that remixing should be banned by the state? What threats did jazz and rock 'n roll pose? And what does all of that mean for the conflicts between artists and copyright today? » Read more

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Open books: The opensource.com summer reading list

We asked opensource.com contributors for their recommendations for some can't-miss summer reading. Some books are new. Some are recent favorites. All offer examples of how the open source way is being employed in areas beyond technology. From coaching individuals to unite as a team, exploring the future of management, to delving deeper into the design process, these books can offer incredible insight and a great end to the summer. Enjoy.


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