Jim Whitehurst

Great leaders are comfortable with who they are

Leadership skills from Red Hat President and CEO Jim Whitehurst

Over the last 25 years of my career—from serving as a partner at the Boston Consulting Group (BCG), to my time at Delta Air Lines, to my current role as president and CEO of Red Hat—I've been exposed to my fair share of leaders. I've learned that leaders and leadership styles can vary greatly depending on the company culture, industry and size, but there's one commonality I've noticed among all of them: to be effective, leaders must be respected. » Read more

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Teens and their first job: How to get on the path to a happy career

open source jobs

I grew up in the 1980s in Columbus, Georgia. You needed a car to get around, so I did not work until I could drive. Within months of getting my driver's license, I got my first job as a part-time computer programmer for a stockbroker.

It is easy to forget that in the 80s, computers and programming were not nearly as pervasive (or popular) as they are today. I had been interested in computers for a couple of years by then. My prized possession was my Kaypro II with 64K RAM and dual floppies. Part-time jobs using computers were rare, so I felt lucky to find the perfect fit. I was tasked with building a computer program that would perform contact management, tracking interactions with potential and current clients. I wish I understood the value of such a system back then. Good thing Marc Benioff did. (Thank you, Salesforce.com.)

I ended up working with the stockbroker for more than two years until I went to college. I learned several very valuable lessons. » Read more

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Open or die: Innovation led by open source

Jim Whitehurst: Open or die

A shift is happening in the way innovation is occurring.

Businesses are moving from closed systems to open, collaborative innovation. Red Hat CEO, Jim Whitehurst, focused on the three major components influencing this shift in his keynote, Open or die?, at the Open Business Conference held in San Francisco this week (April 29-30, 2013). » Read more

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Thread of openness weaves TedX talks together

TedX

TED is a nonprofit that seeks out "ideas worth spreading", showcasing them annually at a conference before a select audience. Thankfully, the best talks are recorded and released for the viewing pleasure of the rest of us, albeit one by one, over an extended period of time. Chris Grames, President and Partner at New Kind, describes waiting for them as, "like a painfully-slowly dripping faucet teases a man dying of thirst."

Now, the folks at TED offer another way for us to quench our desire to hear great business ideas from people who have made their dreams come true—locally organized TedX events. Already this year, 2,013 TedX events have been held around the world, and there are 746 to go. Clearly, what started out as a small group of people talking about technology, entertainment, and design, has grown to encompass a diverse range of topics and industries with millions listening. 

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Jim Whitehurst's big idea: Effective leaders must operate as catalysts

Ron Wilder and Jim Whitehurst at Big Idea Forum

Every year, Marbles in downtown Raleigh holds their annual Big Idea Forum. The lunchtime discussion aims to highlight ways corporate and community leaders shape organizations and people through inspiration and innovation.

Jim Whitehurst, President & CEO of Red Hat, Inc., opened up to Ron Wilder, a business author and executive coach, this past Wednesday, October 3rd, to talk about his big idea. » Read more

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Is information a competitive differentiater?

Is information a competitive differentiater?

I started thinking about the value of information here in San Francisco at the Open Source Business Conference (OSBC), held May 21-22. It's the first day of a two-day conference, and some of the leading experts in open source are here presenting, learning, networking and more. During the opening remarks by John Amato, Vice President & Publisher, Computerworld, and Matt Asay, Vice President Business Development, Nodeable, we discovered that about half the attendees are new to the conference, which is great for open source.

The first keynote speaker was Jim Whitehurst, President & CEO, Red Hat. Whitehurst focused his talk on » Read more

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Jim Whitehurst on the next twenty years of Linux

Open source leader Jim Whitehurst, Red Hat CEO

LinuxCon 2011 kicked off this morning with a retrospective from Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation, on the accomplishments of Linux in its first twenty years. Self-professed geek and Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst, whose Linux use started with Slackware in the late 90s, followed by Fedora, followed Zemlin with a keynote addressing the next 20 years of Linux. » Read more

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LinuxCon schedule announced, including Torvalds, Mickos, Whitehurst

Today The Linux Foundation announces the lineup of speakers for this year's LinuxCon North America, and we're pretty happy to see a lot of opensource.com contributors on the agenda. As a part of the event, the foundation is celebrating the 20th anniversary of Linux through various activities, including a LinuxCon keynote by Linus Torvalds. » Read more

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Your ideas are your assets: Jim Whitehurst on 21st century value

20th century companies defined success by their hard assets. In contrast, 21st century businesses are based around information and ideas. In this video, Jim Whitehurst, President and CEO of Red Hat, explores how we add value in today's contemporary business, and, by extension, as a society.

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The government doesn't look good naked.

So 19 months into the Open Government Directive, we seem to have a backlash. The government has spent millions of dollars collecting, organizing, and cataloging its data to make it more available to the public. An unprecedented effort. Some of this data is frivolous, some of it is valuable, but I think we can all agree that more transparency is always — always — a good thing. » Read more

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