MakerBot

The force of gravity still applies for 3D printers

launch of the 3D printer revolution

Just a month ago, our geek wish of getting a 3D printer was granted: a Makerbot Replicator 2X arrived at our office. Since then we've been busy learning by trial and error about the possibilities and limitations of 3D printing. You can read my review of the Printrbot Simple Kit.

So far, in short, I can describe 3D printing as: Building an object, by depositing layers, and creating every layer by drawing it with melted plastic. The key to understanding 3D printing, and thus learning how to do it better, is to think about the objects as a stack of layers. Then, consider how the layers will look like as they are being stacked. » Read more

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Do you have access to a 3D printer?

3D printing the open source way

3D printing is changing the game. The way we strategize, plan, create, and do business is different now that objects can be materialized by adding layer upon layer. » Read more

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Open Hardware Summit open to hybrid models

Wired editor-in-chief Chris Anderson

If there was an overarching message from the speakers at last week's Open Hardware Summit, particularly those in the first morning block, it's that openness isn't that critical. It sounds strange coming from a conference whose name starts with "open," but speaker after speaker talked about hybrids and doing whatever worked, not just doing what was open. » Read more

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Success in the second year of the Open Hardware Summit

Success in the second year of the Open Hardware Summit

The Open Hardware Summit (OHS), now in its second year, brings together folks from all different backgrounds and truly represents a melting pot of those with interests in the open hardware (open source designs, firmware, software, process) movement. In fact, I’d argue that the open hardware movement is more inclusive than open source software is at this point. There are far more women attending and speaking at these events (OHS is even organized by women), combined with a lot less of the pretentious prima donnas you see in male-dominated open source software. » Read more

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How hackerspaces make any city an open source city

At SCaLE 9x, Leigh Honeywell gave a keynote on the history and future hackerspaces. (Watch the video.) She provided a history of the hackerspace movement both inside and outside of the US and its slow but steady spread through the world. She also talked about some of the things that hackerspaces are known for, and some notable things that the hackerspace she co-founded, Hacklab Toronto, had done. » Read more

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Operation: Stick Figure Army turns 2D teaching into 3D learning

In Meadville, Pennsylvania, it's snowing. And when we get lake effect snow this many days in a row, the only thing to be done is to pour a cup of hot chocolate, put your feet up by the fire, and tell a yarn about open source in education.

Specifically, I'm going to tell you a story of how the research and development work of two women in computer science is going to be transformed into a service to support blind students in the classroom by 20 first-years at Allegheny College. And we need your support.

» Read more

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Video: Robots that make things! (And how sharing is the best way to run a business and your life.)

A few folks from Red Hat's video team had the opportunity last summer to attend the first Open Video Conference in New York. We met some inspiring, open minded, and highly motived people and even got the chance to talk to a few of them on camera. (You know, just doing our job.)

One person that we absolutely had to talk to was Bre Pettis: video blogger, open source advocate, entrepreneur, and all around great guy. Bre is one of the founders of MakerBot Industries, a company that makes "robots that make things." Awesome robots. Awesome things. » Read more

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