music - Page number 3

Theft! A History of Music —Part 3: If I could turn forward time...

Imagine a 20-year-old musician publishing his work today. Let's pretend he's living the fast and reckless life of a rock star and will die young at 45. Because the copyright term has been ratcheted up to life of the author plus 70 years (or 95 years from publication for corporate works), you won't be able to sample his work without permission (for your heartfelt tribute song, of course), until 2105. But since you're not living his rock star lifestyle, maybe you can hang on another 95 years to grab your chance. » Read more

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Theft! A History of Music—Part 2: Copyright jams

Our society and its lawmakers are notoriously bad at predicting the effects of new technologies. I think of the ongoing battles over new distribution formats, like the assumption that "the VCR [would be] to the American film producer and the American public as the Boston strangler is to the woman home alone." Jennifer Jenkins, one of the authors of Theft! A History of Music, has an even more basic and older example: musical notation. » Read more

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Theft! A History of Music—Part 1: Plato and all that jazz

Why did Plato argue that remixing should be banned by the state? What threats did jazz and rock 'n roll pose? And what does all of that mean for the conflicts between artists and copyright today? » Read more

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Abstract Logix: Changing the music experience for everyone with the open source way

Abstract Logix is changing the music industry experience for musicians, fans, and retailers. How? By embracing the open source way and using a community-focused and collaborative approach.

We interviewed Souvik Dutta, founder of Abstract Logix, to get a better understanding of how the open source way is helping to create a stable business and how they produce, distribute, and promote music collaboratively. Abstract Logix helps to enable gifted musicians around the world spread their audio art. They offer a groomed selection of innovative music from artists who are rarely represented in traditional retail shops.

How do they do this? » Read more

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How to kill a dinosaur in 3 easy steps

In 2000 the punk rock band NOFX released an album called Pump Up The Valuum. When I first heard the CD, I immediately took to the song "Dinosaurs Will Die." (Warning--contains explicit lyrics) Shortly thereafter I got into the open source movement, and I cannot count how many times the lyrics from that song have stuck out in my head. » Read more

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Open sound series: Part 3 - Ampache

Building a community is core to all open source projects. In fact, an open source project that lacks a community is likely missing the point of being open source. So what happens when your open project is designed to create communities? » Read more

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Reminder: Our Life needs you. Write for us.

Here on the Life channel, we've realized there are a lot of stories about everyday life that are using open source principles—collaboration, participation, sharing, transparency—what we call the open source way. But we can't find them all. And we certainly can't tell them all. That's where you come in. » Read more

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Panel: Copyright Needed In Music, But Should Benefit Musicians

This story was written and originally posted by Kaitlin Mara at Intellectual Property Watch.

Copyright is critical to the survival of the music industry and its creators, but lack of respect for copyright is not why artists are struggling to make ends meet, argued a recent panel of media lawyers and music industry experts. The blame for that lies squarely on the corporate-focus of the music industry, and how it has bent copyright law to serve companies rather than composers, said a panel at the University of Westminster. » Read more

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Poll: How do you get your music?

If you have ideas on articles about music that you'd be interested in, let us know in the comments. We'll do our best to tune-up a blog post.

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Rock n' Roll, instant messaging, and Creative Commons

What do instant messaging notifications, quintessential 80s rock and a hatred of Autotune have to do with one another? Thanks to the wonders of open source, the Open Your World forum brought together three individuals from decidedly different musical backgrounds with the likes of Brad Sucks, Curt Smith and Daniel James sharing the "stage" of our Creative Commons and the Music Industry panel.
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