nature

The open source solution to the bee colony collapse problem

open source beehive designs

Last year, a third of honeybee colonies in the United States quite literally vanished. Commercial honey operations, previously abuzz with many thousands of bees, fell suddenly silent, leaving scientists and beekeepers alike scratching their heads. The reasons remain mostly a mystery for what is called Colony Collapse Disorder—a disturbing development of the drying up of beehives throughout the industrialised world.

Unfortunately, there's a lot more to the problem than simply running out of honey. Bees are one of the most abundant pollinators in the natural world. They are the unsung, unpaid facilitators of human agricultural practices and have been for as long as we have sewn seeds. Their disappearance would spell disaster for our food supply, with some estimating our species lasting only four years on this planet without them. So, what can be done? » Read more

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Green Energy Corp VP sees value of open communication (smart grids) in the eye of the storm

light bulbs

John Camilleri talks about open source integration for the energy sector. He is VP of Product Development at Green Energy Corp—a leading technology company that provides software solutions and software engineering services to communications, utilities, and energy companies.

How do utilities prepare for force majeure? » Read more

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Video: Staying in touch with nature by sharing.

I posted an article not too long ago about some folks we met at the Open Video Conference last year and Brian Palmer is another great speaker that we got to witness.

Brian is the Digital Channel Manager for Earth-Touch, a wildlife documentary company based out of London and South Africa. There's something different about Earth-Touch, though. They only document the wildlife. This sounds like a no-brainer and expected until you hear some of the practices that other companies employ in capturing some of the dramatic scenes on film. Earth-Touch's focus is on simply showing what happens in the wild, naturally, and interfering as little as possible. » Read more

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