New York Times

Could open source software save New York City's bike share program?

Fail faster

A bike share program that was supposed to be launched last summer in New York City has come to a halt due to software related issues. I can't help but think that if the software was open source, these problems would have been easily resolved, eliminating worrisome delays. » Read more

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NYT features Chicago’s "Adopt-a-Sidewalk"

NYT features Chicago’s "Adopt-a-Sidewalk"

As the Windy City prepares for another major snow season, Chicago’s CTO John Tolva and team have been hard at work, turning out a robust suite of online tools to help citizens track and even support the city’s management efforts: ChicagoShovels.org. The New York Times recently featured their innovative efforts — which ranged from real-time snow plow tracking to 311-powered crowdsourcing:

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Belgian court rules that Google infringes newspaper copyrights

The Belgian Court of Appeals ruled this week that Google is infringing the copyrights of Belgian newspapers by linking to and posting portions of the articles on Google news. Google must remove all articles and photos from Belgian newspapers in French and German or face a fine of 20,000 euros per day.
» Read more

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Evaluating TEDx as a brand strategy

A big part of my day job is to help organizations with their brand positioning and strategy (I also write about brand strategy quite a bit over here).

So when I read the article in the New York Times this past Sunday about TEDx, the relatively new (and incredibly popular) offshoot of the legendary TED conference, I thought it might be a good opportunity to take a closer look. The issue? » Read more

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Three reasons why open source is working for Alzheimer's research

When the open source way starts finding its way to the likes of the pharmaceutical industry, it turns a few heads. A combination of free access and open data has started changing the medical research model, beginning with drug companies collaborating on research for Alzheimer's disease.

Dana Blankenhorn from ZDNet was dead on when he said » Read more

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Navigating the murky waters of the new media: Five lessons from PepsiGate

Recently PepsiCo quietly bought the rights to blog about nutrition on a highly respected science blog network. Outraged bloggers and readers at ScienceBlogs said—well, things I can't repeat here—and dubbed the debacle PepsiGate.

As you may have guessed, the blog quickly vanished, but the resulting debate provides insight into some ethical considerations around the so-called new media: the world of online citizen-based journalism. » Read more

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