open innovation - Page number 2

The U.S. Government promotes open innovation--Is it now mainstream?

We live in an open source world

"We live in an open source world."

For many readers of opensource.com, those words are probably a part of your daily life; in all likelihood, you take them for granted.  They reflect the commonality of how many of you work, and engage publicly.

But I heard those words last month from a former member of Congress. Tom Perriello, the moderator of a panel on 'open innovation’ held at a mainstream think tank here in Washington (the Center for American Progress), gives them a different context. » Read more

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Open innovation is good for business

Open innovation is good for business

Open innovation is an area only beginning to enter mainstream enterprises, despite years of success in open source communities. It allows people both inside and outside the company to get involved and collaborate on new products and processes that result in beneficial change.

Dr. Andrew McAfee, who coined the term "Enterprise 2.0," recently highlighted "open innovation" as an area ripe for mainstream business adoption. Organizations that want to find fresh approaches to their business processes, product or service offerings are encouraged to look outside traditional sources of expertise and be receptive to new contributors. » Read more

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Crowdsourced ideas make participating in government cool again

Crowdsourced ideas make participating in government cool again

The PA Times, published by the American Society of Public Administration, issued a special edition called "From Bureaucratic to Cool: A Call for Public Service." My article on “Crowdsourced Ideas Make Participating in Government Cool Again” describes how government agencies on all levels are turning to Open Innovation platforms to collect the wisdom of the crowds either from their employees or from the public in general. They are closing an important gap that social media platforms so far were not able to address: open innovation platforms are proving a mechanism for targeted knowledge sourcing and knowledge incubation. Innovative ideas and knowledge are not hidden among thousands of comments on Facebook or retweets on Twitter. One of the most prominent examples is Challenge.gov run by GSA – that has just celebrated its first anniversary.

Here is the full reference: » Read more

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Three myths about innovation

Three myths about innovation

Innovation, simply defined, is the process that takes new ideas and implements them in a way that creates value. It's not the same thing as invention, which is an event that occurs at a distinct point in time, often resulting in a single product. Innovation is the extension of invention, the act of bringing things that are invented to market, repeatedly.

An innovation process creates measurable value, by increasing productivity, improving quality, generating new markets, or creating other benefits to consumers, producers, or both.

 As Dell Services' chief innovation officer, I spend a lot of time talking with people about innovation and I'm often amazed how many misconceptions there are about it. Here are three popular myths about innovation, along with some comments about how we at Dell are addressing the issues they raise.

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Can the U.S. 'win the future' without open data?

Winning the Future through Open Innovation,” is a progress report recently released by Aneesh Chopra, US Chief Technology Officer, to the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) on the Administration’s Open Government Initiative.The report highlights a number of programs at different agencies that represent a wide variety of open innovation techniques, from opening datasets and APIs to creating incentives for competition or testing and certifying open standards. » Read more

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User-led innovation can't create breakthroughs. Really?

Earlier this week, Fast Company posted an article by Jens Martin Skibsted and Rasmus Bech Hansen (thanks to Gunnar Hellekson for sending it my way) that may be of interest to folks seeing success with their open source and open innovation efforts.

The article is entitled "User-Led Innovation Can't Create Breakthroughs; Just Ask Apple and IKEA" and here's how it starts: » Read more

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Open*Business: 2010 in review

2010 has been a fantastic year on the Business channel here at opensource.com.

The Business channel's goal is to highlight examples where the open source way has been (or could be) applied to improve businesses. Not just in software development, but in the management, culture, operations, brand, research & development, or any other part of the business.

What were some on this year's highlights? Let's start with a few stats.

Most popular articles » Read more

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Seeking open infrastructure: Contrasting open standards, open source, and open innovation

While “open” normally has connotations of public goods, the idea of “open”–ness has been used for decades as a competitive strategy by firms in the computers and communications industries. Phrases like “open standard,” “open source” and more recently “open innovation” have been used to refer to these strategies.

What do they have in common? Which ones really are “open”? What does “open” mean, anyway? » Read more

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Poll: Open innovation etymology

Even if you know when the term "open innovation" was coined, do you know who came up with it?

Professor Henry Chesbrough, Executive Director of the Center for Open Innovation at the University of California (Berkeley), first used the term in his book, Open Innovation – The New Imperative for Creating and Profiting from Technology. » Read more

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Open innovation and open source innovation: what do they share and where do they differ?

Recently, Stefan Lindegaard, open innovation expert and author of the new book The Open Innovation Revolution, joined opensource.com for a webcast about open innovation. » Read more

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