open source license

The intersection of law and software explained on the JBoss Asylum podcast

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I recently had the honor of being a guest on the JBoss Asylum podcast, hosted by Red Hat's Emmanuel Bernard and Max Rydahl Andersen. We discussed various topics at the intersection of law and software (particularly in relation to open source), including the » Read more

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choosealicense.com and GitHub's license picker

choose an open source license

In a previous article, I discussed the complaints that have been leveled against GitHub during the past year and a half concerning the purported problem of public, seemingly-FLOSS code repositories with no explicit licensing. Here I will address the actions GitHub took in July, which were undoubtedly in response to this criticism.

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What open source RSS feed reader do you use?

RSS reader

The recently announced end-of-life for Google Reader has brought about many articles in the press listing replacements. Unfortunately, many of the replacements suffer from several deficiencies:

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The Mozilla Public License - almost 2.0 (part 1)

The Mozilla Public License - almost 2.0 (part 1)

Over the past 18 months, the Mozilla community has been revising the Mozilla Public License. See earlier post. We recently announced, in true community development fashion, a release candidate--the text that we hope will become MPL 2.0 after one last set of eyes review it. This piece is a brief backgrounder on what has changed in the new MPL, explaining why we're proud of this work and we hope you'll consider reviewing it - and maybe even using it for your next project. » Read more

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Open standards and the royalty problem

In December, the long awaited version 2.0 of the European Interoperability Framework (EIF) was released by the European Commission. Version 1.0 had defined “open standard” as royalty-free, a definition of enormous impact on standards policy because it focused on the user perspective rather than the perspective of standards development organizations. Some standards organizations claim that “open standards” refers only to the way the standard was developed – not the terms of availability. » Read more

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License compliance is not a problem for open source users

License compliance is a major and costly issue for proprietary software, but the license involved in that case is an End User License Agreement (EULA), not a source license delivering extensive liberties. When we compare like-for-like, we discover open source software has no such issues. End-users do not need to have a license management server, do not need to hold audits, do not need to fear BSA raids. Open source is so much easier! » Read more

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