open source - Page number 70

Can Professors Teach Open Source?

At teachingopensource.org, we think so, and we wrote a book to help.  The following excerpt comes from the Foreword of our new textbook, Practical Open Source Software Exploration, which is licensed under Creative Commons BY-SA-3.0.  It's a book that works like an open source software project.  In other words: patches welcome.
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Video: Proprietary data is digital waste: a perspective on Green IT

 

I always look forward to my conversations with Jan Wildeboer. Simply put, he helps me look at the world a little differently. A little more.... openly.  » Read more

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How to tell if your open source project will fail

The new community get-it-done handbook, "The Open Source Way," doesn't seek to be controversial, but with information that's distilled, brief, and to the point, contention is unavoidable. Especially where the book takes a hardline stance on how to act and not act; a stance that is derived from the years of experience of the contributors involved. » Read more

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Document Freedom Day: Passion and politics

The battle for Open Standards in Europe

Today, people and groups around the world are celebrating Document Freedom Day. This is an international day to raise awareness of Open Standards and free document formats. As the event takes place for the third time, the previous focus on the OpenDocument Format (ODF) is broadening to include other free formats such as Ogg. » Read more

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Five questions about building community with Chris Blizzard of Mozilla

I've always been a fan of the Mozilla Foundation, and not just because of the Firefox web browser. As catalyst for some of the great communities in the open source world, Mozilla is something of a recipe factory for what to do right when it comes to building community. As it turns out, Mozilla's Director of Developer Relations, Chris Blizzard, is a long time friend of mine. » Read more

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ODF: Setting the standard for office documents in the public sector

With Document Freedom Day 2010 approaching, this is a good opportunity to consider the reasons why the public sector has increasingly opted for ODF, the document freedom that it enables, and why ODF is an essential feature of any “open” eGovernment strategy. » Read more

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Making Public Records Public: Why open formats are essential for sharing and preserving government data.

By Chander Kant, CEO Zmanda.

Have you ever tried to retrieve a public record from your local, state or federal government? Despite their name, many public records have not been simple or free for citizens to access. Until recently, obtaining copies of even the most basic records has been a grueling process.

There are two layers of barriers in getting to data stored at a government agency: » Read more

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Thoughts from OSBC: What's driving open source acceptance?

Recently I was in the audience for the Open Source Business Conference (OSBC) keynote panel on the future of open source, and part of the discussion was about the rapidly increasing use of open source in both the public and private sector. No one seemed surprised by this fact, but there was some disagreement on the cause. The one thing all the panelists agreed on was this: IT departments are suddenly much more accepting of open source. One of the panelists asked the question, "What is driving IT's acceptance of open source?"

Having worked with IT departments for the better part of two decades--and currently working in the IT department of a major municipality--I knew something the panelists didn't: this is the wrong question. » Read more

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Is Jaron Lanier just a hater, or should we be paying attention?

Last week, my friend Greg DeKoenigsberg posted an article about Jaron Lanier's negative comments regarding open textbooks. At almost very same time, I happened to stumble upon an article Jaron wrote back in 2006 criticizing Wikipedia. » Read more

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Building an open source business

In 2002 I was working for Oculan, a company that founded an open source network management application platform called OpenNMS. Oculan used this platform as the basis for a network management appliance, but my job was to create a services and support business around the platform itself.

In May, just after the release of OpenNMS version 1.0, Oculan got new investors, who decided to focus on the appliance and to stop working on OpenNMS.

I knew that without at least one person dedicated to OpenNMS it would die, and I wasn't ready to give up on it. So I went to the CEO and asked to become the administrator of the project. We talked for a bit, and then he looked at his watch and said that if I was off his payroll by Friday, he'd give me a couple of servers, the OpenNMS domain names, and his blessing to continue on with OpenNMS. » Read more

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