participation - Page number 2

Top 10 open government posts from 2012

Open government year in review

It's been a great year for the open source movement in government. I feel like we've moved the needle on the transparency, collaboration, and participation fronts. More importantly, the open government movement saw a fair amount of code released under open source licenses and lots of activity in the open data space.

In 2012, we discussed a variety of topics on opensource.com. » Read more

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Celebrating 10 years of Creative Commons

Creative Commons

Creative Commons is celebrating 10 years of helping artists, writers, technologist, and other creators share our knowledge and creativity with the world. We've been able to maximize our digital creativity, sharing, and innovation. For example, governments are using Creative Commons for their open data portals.

Earlier this year, the UC Santa Cruz library adopted a Creative Commons (CC-BY) license for all of its content. YouTube now has over 4 million videos available under Creative Commons, allowing everyone to remix and edit the videos. » Read more

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Gather crowdsourced public input with Shareabouts app

Citizen participation

As stressful as elections can be, they always bring a welcome surge of patriotism. United States citizens have a lot of opinions about their government, and election time is a good reminder that actually vollunteering time and resources is the best way to facilitate real change. Luckily we live in the 21st century, and collaborating to make change has never been easier. Apps like Shareabouts make it simple to get involved and do your part to make our cities great.

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Discovering hidden influencers that make and break project success

robobee

A provocative research finding is that 75-90% of all large organizational projects fail to meet their original objectives, (Patterson et al. (2006)). The same research suggests human practices and behaviors—more than technical or financial matters—are at the root of the breakdowns. » Read more

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Beth Noveck predicts two phases of open government in TED Talk

A new dawn

I recently watched a new TED Talk by the first and former White House Deputy CTO Beth Noveck, delivered in Edinburgh, Scotland. She is really the initial instigator of the modern open government movement in the United States and is now working to make it a reality worldwide. What I like best about her talk is the litany of examples that are happening all over the world—from painting the national budget on hundreds of walls so that locals can comment on it to a Texas wiki that lets citizens and businesses comment on regulations. Take a look:

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Participatory culture creates a sense of belonging

participation

In 2005, I started a new job working as the public geek at the Takoma Park Maryland Library, a public library in the Washington D.C. area. My main duty is helping youth and adults use the 28 public Linux stations. I started the job soon after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and one day found myself welcoming several Katrina refugees who had relocated to Takoma Park.

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Community Spotlight: Andrew Krzmarzick, enabling open source and empowering citizens in government

five questions with an opensource contributor

As the Community Manager of GovLoop—a highly active online community connecting more than 50,000 public sector professionals—Andrew Krzmarzick suspects his role is pretty similar to leading an open source project.

The open source way guides the company's decisions, communications, and interactions. And open source solutions enable them to empower citizens around the country (and the world!) who don't want to wait for their cities to make updates to a page or build apps and resources that makes their lives easier.

Hear Andrew speak more on this at the 2012 National Conference for Government Webmasters this year on September 11th in Kansas City. He will discuss citizen generated initiatives—Hackathons, CityCamps, LocalWiki and Facebook pages—that provide the community with much needed, easy to navigate, web-based resources. » Read more

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UPDATE: Colorado is coding for their community

Code for Communities

UPDATE: Six mobile applications have been selected for teams to work on.  Each app targets a different facet of the community where there is an information gap.  The apps will be released with open source code to benefit the community. The following apps have been chosen:

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An architecture of participation

An architecture of participation

What happens when half of the world's population lives in cities? When over three billion people are online? When there are more than 15 billion connected devices?

Old organizational models hit end-of-life. People behave differently. Organizations behave differently. What worked in the old world doesn't work in the new. » Read more

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Open thread: How to improve our community discussion list?

open thread

Let's talk about our community discussion list.

It's a public mailing list we created some time ago to facilitate conversation about opensource.com. We envisioned it as a channel for communication regarding both the website and the community that sustains it—not the content we feature here. And we think we can do a better job of using this list to encourage participation in opensource.com, to increase the level of transparency surrounding issues its management, and to foster collaboration between its community members. » Read more

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