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Here in the District of Columbia, a loosely-knit group comprised of social workers, librarians, technologists, environmentalists, disability rights advocates, and educators has come together in the past few years. This coalition, known as the Broadband Bridge, sees digital justice and digital inclusion as a cornerstone towards self-determination in traditionally underserved communities.

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Highlights from OSCON 2012 and the Community Leadership Summit

Tim O'Reilly's 2012 OSCON keynote

Whether you're in Portland trying to keep up with everything, or at home and following along, here are some mid-week highlights from OSCON 2012. » Read more

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Optimizing your OSCON experience

OSCON

It's that time of year, again—the annual family reunion for many folks in the open source community, O'Reilly's Open Source Conference (OSCON). More than 3,000 people will gather at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland to discuss a wide variety of topics from over 300 speakers on July 16-20, 2012. OSCON has 18 tracks this year, and I'm particularly looking forward to a number of sessions on community, geek lifestyle, healthcare, and open education.

For those of you who are heading to OSCON for the first time, I have a few tips to help you get the most out of this year's conference: » Read more

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What makes a city open source?

What makes a city open source?

What qualities make a city open source? Is it technology, government policies, or businesses? No. It's the mindset of the people. It's the philosophy and the culture.

About a year ago, I started trying to define an open source city.  I'm very interested in seeing my own city (Raleigh, NC) become a hub for open source and a leader in open government.  With Red Hat's announcement to stay headquartered in Raleigh earlier this month, the City of Raleigh appears poised to "establish a growing ecosystem of partners and providers around the open source leader and to bolster Raleigh’s reputation as a leading open source community."

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Portland launches City Sync to increase government transparency

Today in his Open Source Bridge keynote, Mayor Sam Adams of Portland, OR announced Project City Sync, the next step in making local and regional governments more transparent.

Adams called on the attendees to help put coherence to city work, to help link up governments, and to put some framework to those interactions through the new project, which is currently live in beta. » Read more

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Poll: The world's first open source city

Poll: The world's first open source city

I posted an article earlier this week claiming Raleigh, NC is primed to be an open source hub. In the comments, Evan Prodromou shared a similar and coincidentally timed blog post: Montreal the Open Source startup hub. » Read more

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Who had the first government open source policy?

Brian Purchia of Burson-Marsteller has a post over on GovFresh about the value of open source to unions. His argument pivots on cost-savings. I think you could make a more expansive argument that includes risk mitigation and innovation, but describing the advantage to unions is an interesting angle I hadn’t seen before. » Read more

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