principles

Open Contracting Principles reflect norms and best practices from around the world

open data in government

Authored by Lindsey Marchessault


Over the past year, the Open Contracting Partnership (OCP) has facilitated a global consultation process to create a set of open contracting principles. The principles reflect norms and best practices from around the world related to disclosure and participation in public contracting.

Nearly 200 open contracting collaborators from government, private sector, civil society, donors, and international financial institutions contributed to the discussion from various sector-specific perspectives (such as service delivery, infrastructure, extractive industries, and land).

The resulting Open Contracting Global Principles build on existing norms and conventions related to » Read more

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The U.K. Cabinet Office solves the open standards policy conundrum

two countries

Governments certainly have more than enough to concern themselves with these days—financial crises, natural disasters and terrorism, to name just a few. Given that’s the case, it’s surprising that so many are finding the time to worry about what kind of standards the products and services they purchase comply with. But they are.

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Five major standards organizations speak out

open data standards

What's going on at the International Telecommunications Union?

Earlier this month, the IEEE, Internet Architecture Board (IAB), Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), Internet Society, and World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) signed a joint agreement to affirm and adhere to a set of principles that establish what they call The Modern Paradigm for Standards» Read more

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How to survive in an open world

TedX - Four Principles of an Open World

According to Don Tapscott’s "Four Principles of an Open World" TED talk, we are experiencing one of the most significant times in human history. Through the Internet and other innovations, we are able to collaborate like never before, and that change is having a profound effect on society.

The world is becoming more open, and people are demanding a higher level of truth and transparency from major institutions, like government and corporate structure. As Tapscott explains, these institutions must evolve to adapt to this new “open world” or face failure.  The collapse of several powerful banks and the resulting economic struggle is one example he gives to prove that adapting is vital.  » Read more

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