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Resolve to be more open in 2013

Open ant trail

It's a new year, with new opportunities for the open source way to change and innovate life, education, government, business, health, and law. For each of us as individuals, 2013 is a chance to resolve to be more open. Check out these ways to start this New Year's resolution off right, and in the comments below tell us how you plan to practice openness. » Read more

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Hampshire College distributes free software bundle to all incoming students

open undergraduate college

Hampshire student and FSF campaigns organizer Kira shares the success of their ambitious project to help fellow students get started with free software. The achievements of Kira's organization, LibrePlanet/Students for Free Culture, is exciting and replicable outside of Hampshire. Kira provides suggestions to help other students realize the same changes at their schools.

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Marketing open source is made for geeks

Kings of business

Up until about ten years ago, it was extremely unfashionable to be a geek. Geeks were considered the black swans of the social world: they were perceived as having limited social skills, little interest in non-programming activities, and few friends.

Fast forward to today, and things have changed significantly for the geek. Geeks today run the coolest companies, create the most cutting-edge trends, and are popular guests on the social circuit. And as the geek has evolved, so too has his or her skills: today's geeks are not just clever programmers, but they also know how to finance and market their products.

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The FUEL project: A localization effort of content, collaboration, and consistency

fuel bubbles

FUEL stands for frequently used entries for localization, and the FUEL project [community wiki ; project website] is an open source effort that aims to solve the problem of inconsistency and lack of standardization in computer software localization.

FUEL provides standard and consistent guidelines for translated-language computer users. FUEL works to create linguistic and technical resources like standardized terminology resources, computer translation style and convention guides, and assessment methodologies. » Read more

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