sharing - Page number 2

Should Hostess open source their recipes?

flour + butter + stuff

By now, many of you have seen that Hostess brands has closed. Many people are going to miss their favorite treats. On their website, they state the following: » Read more

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The Belief Genome: an open source technology startup

belief

You know the Human Genome project. Well, this is the Belief Genome project. Instead of mapping genes, Sidian Jones is mapping beliefs—across ages, genders, and geographies. He says that beliefs are what makes us tick. They are how we move about in the world and the why to our decisions. Indeed, from what we're eating for lunch to who we're voting for in the next election, our beliefs affect our lives. And because they can be identified—some basic, some complex, some grouped into systems and religions—they can be mapped.

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Does your organization have a process for collaboration?

left and right brain

Most businesses today know that utilizing collaboration tools increases the liklihood success for a project, and for the organization as a whole. When people work together, brain power is multiplied; not only does more work tend to get done, but better work. The loner mentality—whether it's applied to how we think about office space, meetings, or project management—just doesn't measure up.

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Smart notebooks link virtual teams across the net

connecting people

Do we really need yet another collaboration tool? Miles Fidelman, a networking expert whose experience seems to span time, thinks so. He's worked with Bolt, Beranek, and Newman on military command and control systems, built a small hosting company, and started a community networking non-profit called the Center for Civic Networking.  » Read more

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Open source is like falling in love

Open source is for lovers

I've always believed that the best things in life should come in open source packages. Openness is a natural synonym with selflessness and, thus, with love in its truest form. That's the analogy that instantly came to my mind after reading this article by Bryan Behrenshausen, which discusses ways to explain the concept of openness to your friends. » Read more

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Open source creates a more compassionate global education

Open source creates a more compassionate global education

Rock legend Roger Waters, of Pink Floyd fame has asked many interesting questions (in song). This one (posted on his website) might be one you don’t expect: “Will the technologies of communication in our culture, serve to enlighten us and help us to understand one another better, or will they deceive us and keep us apart?”

Will educators, parents, and children view free and open source as a way to create a kinder, sharing, and cooperative relationships with one another in the United States and around the world? » Read more

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An open source analogy: Open source is like sharing a recipe

Open source is like sharing a recipe

I love listening to open source gurus explain open source to those who have never encountered it, and especially to those with little computing background. In conversations with folks who may have never heard the term 'source code,' open source advocates don't typically have recourse to related words like 'Linux,' 'copyleft,' or 'binary blobs.' That comfortable vocabulary suddenly fails them, leaving them frustrated and stammering. » Read more

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It's the culture, stupid! How Atlassian maintains an open information culture

It's the culture, stupid

All modern businesses run on information, so business management is also about Information Management. However, software alone cannot transform an organization. Information Management mastery doesn't come from technology, it comes from the people! More specifically, it comes down to the CEO instilling an Information Culture for staff to follow. It's leadership not by force, but by example. » Read more

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ACOs and Moneyball medicine part IV: Risk-reduction architectures

ACOs and Moneyball medicine part IV: Risk-reduction architectures

We need to "measure what matters" as the saying goes. As we move to new payment models, we'll need to develop platforms that are designed to measure and learn from a wide array of data points about what works in keeping people healthy. Of course, we'll need health care architectures that can support big data across a wide variety of platforms to enable better algorithms and more learning. There's certainly big opportunity for connecting all these systems.

But it's not just the connection of data in and of itself that will lead to improvements in the triple aim of care, health and costs...Health IT architecture itself can improve the likelihood of cost savingsWe need to look deeper at the IT platform as a risk-reducer that can significantly reduce health care costs. Could we one day have an actuarial field of study in the network science in health care?

What do I mean by this? How do architectures reduce risk? Well, mostly by connecting problems with solutions, but in other ways as well. Let's explore this a bit. » Read more

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Open source makes you bolder

open source makes you bolder

I earn a living at a public library in the Washington, DC area. About a year ago I was trying to explain Twitter to someone for the fifth time that week. The person listening to me just wasn't getting it. "I need to give a public talk about Twitter here at this library," I muttered to myself. "That way I won't have to explain Twitter to every person who doesn't get it." » Read more

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