transparency - Page number 13

Transparency, participation, and collaboration: The distinguishing principles of open source

I believe that, over time, Jaspersoft’s distinction will be less about it being an open source software company and more about its abilities as a great business intelligence software company. I expect declining distinction for our open source-ness will partly occur because the success of open source software and the benefit it brings the community and customers become better accepted and understood each year (and, therefore, less unique). I also believe that the most valuable aspect of the open source model will long endure, way after the sheen fades from the download, forum post, or roadmap voting. That is, the principles of open source software are its most distinguishing characteristic and will eventually reach not just all technology companies, but all other industries as well.

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Poll: meritocracy and fairness

» After you vote, discuss this topic in-depth on the article, Building a positive meritocracy: It's harder than it sounds or in the comments below.

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Abstract Logix: Changing the music experience for everyone with the open source way

Abstract Logix is changing the music industry experience for musicians, fans, and retailers. How? By embracing the open source way and using a community-focused and collaborative approach.

We interviewed Souvik Dutta, founder of Abstract Logix, to get a better understanding of how the open source way is helping to create a stable business and how they produce, distribute, and promote music collaboratively. Abstract Logix helps to enable gifted musicians around the world spread their audio art. They offer a groomed selection of innovative music from artists who are rarely represented in traditional retail shops.

How do they do this? » Read more

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The government doesn't look good naked.

So 19 months into the Open Government Directive, we seem to have a backlash. The government has spent millions of dollars collecting, organizing, and cataloging its data to make it more available to the public. An unprecedented effort. Some of this data is frivolous, some of it is valuable, but I think we can all agree that more transparency is always — always — a good thing. » Read more

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An open source education--for educators

One of the challenges of working in the space between academia and open source communities is translating the cultural and timescale differences. One approach to bridging the gap is to empower people already in the academic space–like professors--to navigate the free and open source software (FOSS) world and bring that knowledge back to the institutions they come from. The week-long POSSE Professors' Open Source Summer Experience (POSSE) workshop, sponsored by Red Hat, aims to do just that. » Read more

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Three Keys to Success For the 21st Century Manager

A trio of recent Harvard Business Review blog posts all center around a common theme: what does it take to be a successful business leader and manager in the 21st century? What traits and characteristics should this new generation of business leader possess? » Read more

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Give me some of that old-time, open source religion

We’ve accepted the obvious benefits of open source principles in business and education, law and healthcare. Openness, transparency, and knowledge-sharing helps more people prosper more quickly. We theorize that it can work in any endeavor where communal information needs to be collected, shared, and maintained. In the Life channel, we get to examine some of the less-obvious avenues where open source is found--and here is one that even surprises us a little: open source religion. » Read more

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Five questions about open innovation with Stefan Lindegaard


On Wednesday, September 1, opensource.com will be hosting a webcast with Stefan Lindegaard, one of the world's leading experts on open innovation. » Read more

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Navigating the murky waters of the new media: Five lessons from PepsiGate

Recently PepsiCo quietly bought the rights to blog about nutrition on a highly respected science blog network. Outraged bloggers and readers at ScienceBlogs said—well, things I can't repeat here—and dubbed the debacle PepsiGate.

As you may have guessed, the blog quickly vanished, but the resulting debate provides insight into some ethical considerations around the so-called new media: the world of online citizen-based journalism. » Read more

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