transparency - Page number 7

CityCamp: Organizing an unconference for a transparent city government

Organizing an unconference is easy if you've got passionate people with the right talent, leaders with a strong vision, and the right organizational tools chosen by the team. Typically, it's a group of volunteers who come together and self-organize into a community of passion. This was also the case for the first CityCamp Raleigh, being held June 3-5.

CityCamp is an unconference focused on innovation for municipal governments and community organizations. CityCamp Raleigh is three days of open sourced talks, workshops, and hands-on problem solving, to re-imagine the way the web, applications, technology, and participation will shape the future of our city. » Read more

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Building a scalable open government process

Much of the energy and effort around open government to date has literally been hacked together or leans towards a reactive, transparency watchdog approach to making government more extroverted.

This is understandable. Any new growth area has its experimental phase and, in order to discover what works, you must try everything. After two years of open government (yes, others have been doing this much longer), we’re at a point where we’ve tried a number of tricks, and it’s time to assess what works and what doesn’t. » Read more

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Is the future open? Ask a fourteen-year-old.

In a NY Times op-ed, David Hajdu posits that the spate of notable musicians all of the same age (turning 70 this year) is attributable to their turning 14 in the mid-1950s when rock 'n roll was just getting its start. "Fourteen is a formative age," his theory goes. What if that's not just for musicians? What about technology? And what does it mean for today's 14-year-olds? » Read more

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Want people to embrace the open source way? Don't talk, do.

The June issue of Harvard Business Review features an interesting article by Roger Martin (one of the leading management minds of our time and author of the just published book Fixing The Game). The article tells the story of how Scott Cook, founder and current Chairman of Intuit, kicked off an effort to reinvent Intuit as a design-driven company. » Read more

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Bernanke and the Fed: Turning towards open

The Federal Reserve System (FRS, FRB, FED, "the Fed," see Wikipedia) took form in 1913 when Congress passed the Federal Reserve Act. It established the ruling bodies, set up a few oversight committees, and granted certain abilities that were intended to help regulate and stabilize the banking industry. » Read more

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When best practices aren't good enough: Putting the performance review on review

It's one of the toughest—and most important—questions in business: How do you mobilize and unleash the best gifts of every single person in your organization? And how do you create an environment and systems for work that ignite extraordinary passion, imagination, and initiative? » Read more

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Open leadership, on demand

Every time there's an Open Your World Forum webcast, I mark my calendar. And every time, something comes up, and I miss the webcast. Fortunately for the absent-minded among us, you can get the webcasts on demand.

(Here's where I should also admit to having a short attention span--and loving the option to fast-forward!)

So this morning, I pulled up the Charlene Li webcast, Open Leadership. » Read more

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Transparency for All, Until It Affects Me

A draft executive order from the Obama administration recently surfaced titled “Disclosure of Political Spending by Government Contractors.” If signed and implemented, potential contractors bidding on federal work would be required to disclose contributions and spending two years back. » Read more

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Open health and medical gag orders

Last week a friend of mine posted on Facebook, “I need a new lawnmower. Any opinions on what I should get?”

She received several responses. One person suggested a goat. Another posted a picture of an attractive shirtless man with bulging muscles gleaming with sweat as he worked in the yard. But others identified the pros and cons of various lawnmower brands for her. Based on those comments and reviews, she went with a Fiskar's momentum reel mower because it "won't need to be repaired."
» Read more

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Designing open collaboration in Red Hat Global Support Services

Red Hat's Global Support Services (GSS) organization is accountable for customer loyalty. In that capacity, we're in the business of solving complex technical problems experienced by our customers. In February of 2009, the GSS management team began a journey to determine if we could serve our customers better, and ultimately increase customer loyalty, by improving the ability of our highly trained technical support associates to collaborate with each other. The fundamental idea was that if we could take away certain structural, cultural, and procedural barriers that separated different groups of associates, we could increase the flow of knowledge, reduce the duplication of efforts, and ultimately provide customers with more accurate, more consistent, and faster results. » Read more

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