Twitter - Page number 2

On Twitter, do you follow or listen?

On Twitter, do you follow or listen?

Something caught my attention in this story by Phil Shapiro. It was something he said in the video presentation he made--as he was describing what Twitter is and what people use it for, he made the argument that the term followers should be changed to listeners. This is where my brain started racing. » Read more

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Open source makes you bolder

open source makes you bolder

I earn a living at a public library in the Washington, DC area. About a year ago I was trying to explain Twitter to someone for the fifth time that week. The person listening to me just wasn't getting it. "I need to give a public talk about Twitter here at this library," I muttered to myself. "That way I won't have to explain Twitter to every person who doesn't get it." » Read more

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Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on open source and "growing the pie"

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on open source and "growing the pie"

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) recently announced one of the most progressive open source policies in the US government. They reiterated the current OMB and DOD guidance by making open source commercial software, but they also went one step further: code they write is open by default. I am totally impressed. » Read more

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I miss E-mail

I miss E-mail

I miss asynchronous conversation.

I miss the ability to have an actual thread of thought preserved in something less ephemeral than memory, or in some chat log somewhere on one of my systems’ hard drives.

I miss the ability to not be there if someone has an observation I’m interested in. I don’t want to have to observe in real time. » Read more

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Twitter co-founder Biz Stone on success, failure, and the future of social

Biz Stone, Twitter co-founder

Twitter (as well as Xanga, Odeo, and Blogger) co-founder Biz Stone keynoted this week’s 2012 Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference with the history of Twitter alongside advice on the future of the social web and what it means to be successful.

"The story of Twitter... this is a weird story," he began. Stone left Google “at a time when it was silly to leave,” as he put it, and with Evan Williams started Odeo, which used RSS to aggregate and publish podcasts. Then Apple created iTunes, and the Odeo founders started looking for the next project. » Read more

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When metadata comes to Twitter

When metadata comes to Twitter

Chris Lehmann is the principal of the Science Leadership Academy in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. I love reading his education-related tweets because of his many interesting ideas, insights and observations. There's another side to Chris, though. Chris is a rabid sports fan, and he'll unleash a torrent of tweets during certain sporting events. I can appreciate his sports fervor, but to me those sports tweets are more noise rather than signal. I'd love to be able to tell Twitter, “give me all of Chris Lehmann's education-related tweets and none of his sports tweets.” (I also want Chris to continue tweeting his sports tweets, because those are an essential part of who he is.) » Read more

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Inside NYSCATE: Moodle, GIMP, and other open source in education

Inside NYSCATE: Moodle, GIMP, and other open source in education

As an educator, trained Linux systems administrator, and technology director for a K-12 school district, I have been actively involved with NYSCATE (The New York State Association for Computers and Technologies in Education), a non-profit organization that works to lead the transformation of teaching and learning through technology. It’s been 20 years since I attended my first NYSCATE conference, and the conference’s open source presence has taken many different forms.  » Read more

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Open source: The antidote for "too big to fail"

Open source: The antidote for "too big to fail"

If you look at the evolution of the IT landscape over the past 30 years, you see two distinct trends: the continued growth of the IT dinosaurs (mainframe computing and mainframe wannabes like Sun) and the emergence of highly modular, adaptable systems, which, by their very process of evolution, not only best suit the current needs, but plant the seeds for the next computer revolution. In the 1980s, modular UNIX systems sowed the seeds for Linux, which in the 1990s sowed the seeds for the rapid spread and adoption of the World Wide Web, which in the 2000s, sowed the seeds for companies like Amazon.com, Google, Facebook, and Twitter to aggregate and disseminate content as never before. » Read more

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Why make a new open source software license? MPL 2.0 (part 3)

Why make a new open source software license?  MPL 2.0 (part 3)

In my previous posts, I discussed the new features of the MPL and the new compatibility between MPL and other licenses. In this final post, I'll summarize a few other small details about the new MPL that may be of interest to opensource.com readers. » Read more

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Lessons in customer service from the best and worst companies on Twitter

Twitter offers customer service access on problems that you couldn't have reached before: the little things. (I've heard they count.) There's a huge opportunity for companies to interact with their customers in a way they haven't before, but a lot of them are still ignoring it. Or worse, they think they're using it, but they're completely missing the point.

BT (Before Twitter) » Read more

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