Business

Analyzing how contributions to OpenStack can be made easier

Community participation

Last month, I asked 55 OpenStack developers why they decided to submit one patch to OpenStack and what prevented them from contributing more. The sample polled people who contributed only once in the past 12 months, looking for anecdotal evidence for what we can do to improve the life of the occasional contributor. To me, occasional contributors are as important as the core contributors to sustain the growth of OpenStack in the medium/long term. » Read more

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Let your code speak for you

share your code

There are rapidly growing feature set, high commit rates, and code contributions happening across the globe to Apache Hadoop and related Apache Software Foundation projects. However, the number of woman developerscommitters, and Project Management Committee (PMC) members in this vast and diversified ecosystem are really diminutive. For the Hadoop project alone, only 5% out of 84 committers are women; and this has been the case for over the past 2 years. » Read more

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Call to all open source communities: Emphasize inclusion

open source communities

As a woman in open source, I have found that the values of community, open development, and flat organizational structure appeal equally to both men and women. The ability of local organizers to freely define what type of culture they are building allows them to adapt in order to appeal to the surrounding culture, while striving to improve access. » Read more

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Advice from 5 Joomla! project leaders: Part 2

women leaders in open source

Last week, five Joomla! project leaders shared insights into their roles and advice for how to be a great leader in an open source community.

Here, we share with you five more leaders in open source sharing wisdom and advice for men and women interested in learning more about how to have a successful career in open source. » Read more

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The Women of OpenStack talk outreach, education, and mentoring

open source conferences

In the open source world, a women-only event seems counter-intuitive. Yet I am finding reasons for such events the more I attend them.

At the OpenStack Summit, a twice-a-year event where OpenStack contributors get together to plan the next release, the Women of OpenStack group has set up events where we invite the women first. Men aren't excluded, but our hope is to get more OpenStack women together. I can hardly capture the value of getting together with other women in OpenStack at the Summit, but here goes. » Read more

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What will drive mainstream desktop Linux?

Linux distributions compared

You know how on TV, NFL analysts will pit one football team against another and say what areas they need to execute well in order to win the game? Here is my take on the most popular desktop Linux distros: Ubuntu, Linux Mint and Chrome OS. Let's not mince words here: Windows is still the undisputed king of the desktop with OS X a distant second. In the meantime, Linux does not even show up on the radar, especially where it counts: in retail outlets and the average consumer's mind. » Read more

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Findings from working on Red Hat's installer

open source company

Until I started graduate school at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, I had never heard of open source. However, every computer science department of any age and stature uses open source software to support their infrastructure. One or another variant of Linux was always being installed on our desktops by the departmental systems administrators, and many academic programs are open source. I accepted the whole situation more or less as I found it. » Read more

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Advice from 5 Joomla! project leaders: Part 1

women leaders in open source

The Joomla! community, inside and outside the company, is diverse and multi-cultural. It is made up of all sorts of people with two things in common: a love for Joomla! » Read more

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Like Arduino? Miniaturize your project with TinyCircuits

open source hardware

When you walk into the cavernous, old tire plant of Canal Place in Akron, Ohio, the last thing that you'd expect to find in this big building is such a "tiny" treasure. Unexpected though it may be, this is where Ken Burns and the TinyCircuits team has set up shop, and it's where they make tiny open source hardware treasures: miniaturized Arduino compatible circuits.

Ken Burns is the founder of TinyCircuits and has always been fascinated with computers. He first got access to a computer, an Apple 2, when he was six years old at a local library, for only 15 minutes a week. He continued working with computers, earned a degree in electrical engineering at the University of Akron, and eventually began working at AVID Technologies, Inc., a company that does product design in Twinsburg. » Read more

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How to analyze corporate contributions to open source projects

Analyzing corporate contributions

In proprietary software, the company contributes 100% of the code. If you think about a traditional proprietary software product, it has a development community of one: the software company itself. The company’s ability to support that product, to influence the features that come in future versions, and to integrate that product with other products in its ecosystem flows directly from its direct control over the source code and its development.

In open source, it is rare that any one company controls anything close to 100% of the source code; in fact, it is often a sign of a weak open source community if one company dominates a project. The power and the value of the open source development model come from many individual and corporate contributors coming together. Using this thinking, we can look at the collaborative corporate contributions to OpenStack. » Read more

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