career

Want an IT job? Learn OpenStack

OpenStack jobs

Whether you love living in the cloud or still cling to your desktop applications whenever possible, it has become increasingly clear in recent years that the cloud is where computing is headed. And if you’re seeking to keep your skills relevant to the IT jobs of today, and tomorrow, understanding the technology that underlies cloud services is critical. Fortunately, the cloud offers many opportunities for using open source software up and down the stack. If being on the cutting edge of cloud infrastructure interests you, it’s probably time to take a look at OpenStack. OpenStack is the engine that makes scalable, rapid, and secure deployments of computing power, networking, and storage possible in a modern datacenter. And it’s open source technology, which means anyone can dive right in and get started. » Read more

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Open source internships make great career starters

Open source lessons for life

For most students, an internship presents a major opportunity to learn and grow in a real-world environment. Interns who join an open source company or project also seem to learn a lot about themselves along the way. Recently, I asked some former Red Hat interns—both newly hired and long-time Red Hat associates—what lessons they learned by working in an open source culture and what advice they have for our next group of interns. » Read more

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Use your open source contributions to get a job

CodeDoor: get a job based on your contributions to open source

One night, after reading the Who’s Hiring Freelance thread on HackerNews, I decided there had to be a more efficient way to match programmers with freelance jobs. While sites like oDesk and eLance are general-purpose marketplaces for freelance workers, they seem to have more of an emphasis on price than quality. On the other hand, sites like TopTal and ooomf vet freelance programmers that apply to join the site by screening the candidates. So, while I’m sure they have a pool of excellent programmers for hire, they require applicants to spend time on a process that may or may not yield work opportunities, even if they get accepted.

So, I started CodeDoor, a platform » Read more

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Open source beginnings, from classroom to career

What I've learned the open source way

During my second year at Shreemati Nathibai Damodar Thackersey (SNDT) Women's University, the first of its kind in India as well as in South-East Asia, I attended a workshop on Python and Orca by Krishnakant Mane. My classmates and I were novices to free and open source software (FOSS) and astonished when we saw a visually impaired person using a computer with the same ease as we did.

I was aware of Linux and had learned the basics of Unix as a freshman, but I had never used Ubuntu, which I thought might be command driven. It had a great interface and there was a lot of new technology for us to learn. That day not only was our class introduced to a new world of open source, but so was the university as a whole.  » Read more

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Robin Miller's formula for a successful open source career

Event report

For an audience composed primarily of open source programmers, developers, and system administrators gathered at SouthEast LinuxFest, Robin Miller's message might be tough to swallow.

"You cannot be a 'Linux sysadmin' in today's world," he said. "Not if you want to maximize your income and job satisfaction."

It's an odd statement to hear in a presentation entitled "Using Linux to Boost Your IT Career," which Miller, the former Slashdot editor known affectionately as "roblimo," delivered June 9, the second day of the conference in Charlotte, NC. » Read more

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